Did Josh Duggar Cheat On His Wife? Ashley Madison Account Reveals Duggar’s Sexual Fantasies

Did Josh Duggar cheat on his wife Anna? Just three months after he confirmed allegations that he sexually abused three girls when he was a teenager, Duggar was named as one of more than 1 million people who had their Ashley Madison dating website account hacked, with personal information leaked online that includes credit card numbers, addresses, and details about members’ sexual fantasies.

According to Gawker, the former 19 Kids and Counting star “maintained two paid accounts on Ashley Madison” — a site created for people who want to cheat on their significant other — while he served as executive director of the conservative D.C. lobbying group, Family Research Council. The charges were allegedly made between between February 2013 until May 2015.

The hacked data reveals that Josh was allegedly looking to have an affair with a “naughty girl” who was interested in “conventional sex” and “sharing fantasies.” He also listed “one-night stands,” “good with your hands,” and “open to experimentation” on the lengthy list of sexual desires.

There were two billing addresses reportedly used for the Ashley Madison accounts that were billed approximately $986 in subscription fees. The first account had a billing address listed as his grandmother Mary’s Fayetteville, Arkansas home — the same home that Anna Duggar gave birth to the couple’s first child in 2009. The second account was reportedly linked to his home in Oxon Hill, Maryland, where he lived with his wife and children while working the Family Research Council.

The leaked data indicates that Josh Duggar also paid $250 for an affair guarantee that would allow members to get their money back if they didn’t have an affair within three months of purchasing the membership feature through their Ashley Madison account.

Member data from the Ashley Madison site was released on Wednesday by hackers who call themselves The Impact Group. CNN Money reports that the files were not easily accessed on the “dark web,” but anyone with knowledge of how to decrypt the files would be able to post the information on websites that are easily accessed through traditional search engines like Google.

[Image: Josh Duggar/Instagram]