The Americans With Disabilities Act Celebrates 25 Years

It has been 25 years since The Americans with Disabilities Act was passed in 1990, and Portland celebrated the milestone with an open mic event. CNN reported on the progress since the major legislation made it illegal to discriminate against someone with a disability, improving quality of life for those suffering from the wide array of disabilities.

Among some of the changes since the act was passed, wheelchair accessibility and the 2008 amendment that included cancer, diabetes, and epilepsy as disabilities.

Oregonians chose to honor the anniversary with an open mic for people to share their stories about living with disabilities.

“I came of age during the ADA,” says Daniel Salomon, a writer who was able to pursue his education while living with an autism spectrum disorder.

“My parents had to go against my school’s recommendation, and pull me out of special ed and got me into mainstream and honors classes with reasonable accommodations.”

One of the accommodations the ADA provides is testing and a support system to facilitate mainstreaming students from special education.

Another participant, Carolyn Anderson, has lived with major depression and diabetes, considered “invisible” disabilities, which can often create an extra layer of challenges.

“I have an invisible disability, and when people hear that a person is disabled, they’re expecting to see someone who may have an amputation, or may be blind,” says the 64-year old.

The Inquisitr reported on other celebrations that took place for the 25th anniversary, including New York City’s Disability Pride Parade earlier this month. It was an inaugural event for the city with over 3,000 participants coming out to show support for those with disabilities. The event drew organizations, local charities, people with disabilities, families and friends.

President Obama addressed the milestone from The White House, too. With a room full of energy and excitement, he addressed a very supportive crowd.

(Photo courtesy of OPB.com.)