National Building Museum Beach Exhibit Opens

The National Building Museum Beach exhibit has opened.

While the “beach” may not have all the aspects of a normal beach — salty water, sharks, and jellyfish — it is still very much a beach and ideal for kids of any ages.

The National Building Museum opened their newest exhibit this month and have already attracted thousands of excited beachgoers. There is one thing though — this beach is not full of water. Instead, there are hundreds of thousands of balls floating around, nearly 750,000 to be exact. Think of a giant pre-school ball pit if you will.

The 10,000-square-foot pit full of white, transparent balls, lies among the great hall’s pillars. No, this massive ball pit is not just for kids either; anyone can enjoy the beach, which is also equipped with lounge chairs, umbrellas, and even mock sand. By using the all-white surroundings, the indoor beach forces people to use their imagination to determine what they want to see.

“In this case, it’s removing the color, and it’s also increasing the scale,” Mustonen said, according to the Washington Post. “All these manipulations or alterations are designed to sort of change your perception and understanding of the environment.”

“This is all about possibilities. As human beings when we put our minds to it we think of really fascinating things and we actually create them,” Executive Director Chase Rynd said, ABC 7 reports.

The indoor beach is open seven days a week and costs $16 for entry. They even have an adults only night on Wednesdays.

While the balls help keep people afloat, smaller items, such as cell phones, wallets, and keys, will sink to the bottom, becoming almost impossible to find.

Alright who will go to this in DC with me???! It's an indoor ball pit beach!!!! pic.twitter.com/IxjSE1PBF2

— M (@gimme_maurathat) July 8, 2015

“The museum anticipates a robust lost and found — and a windfall in loose change. We’ll make a few bucks that way,” marketing and communications manager Emma Filar laughed.

[Photo via Creative Commons]