Australia Zoo: Koala Hugs Mother During Surgery In Australia, Zoo Hospital Shares Touching Pictures

An Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital captured a tender moment between a baby koala and his mom, and then shared the photos with the world.

According to ABC News, a 6-month-old koala was seen hugging his mom while she underwent surgery after being hit by a car. The koala bear mom, Lizzy, and her son, Phantom, were on the Warrego Highway near Coominya, when they were struck. While the baby was okay, Lizzy suffered a collapsed lung and facial trauma, and needed surgery to save her life. The baby stayed by his mom’s side, hugging her tight through some of the procedure — and it’s so stinkin’ sweet!

“Phantom is with Lizzy during her procedures and check ups to ensure neither mum nor bub get stressed out. Similarly, Phantom is in a ‘pouch’ during weighing to ensure he feels safe and protected while away from mum.”

The Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital shared the koala photos, and some good news: Lizzy is recovering well, and is expected to be okay.

According to the New York Daily News, the hospital said that baby Phantom was too young to be away from his mother, so they did their best to keep the two together. It’s clear that the mother and son have a strong bond, and that Phantom wanted to give his mom some love and support while she was feeling blue.

The Australia Zoo hospital that treated the momma koala has treated over 58,000 other animals since it opened 11 years ago. As previously reported by the Inquisitr, the hospital does take donations to help pay for the treatment and care of various animals.

The following message was recently posted on the hospital’s Facebook page.

“We’re busy at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital treating sick and injured native wildlife patients around the clock. Did you know that we’ve treated over 58,000 animals to date? But we can’t do it without your help, so be sure to visit us when you visit Australia Zoo and make a small donation to enter our sneak peek area. You’ll be able to see the vet team treating animals, and you’ll help us continue our important work!”

[Photo by Ian Waldie / Getty Images]