Nintendo Mobile Games Projected To Earn $25 Million Monthly For DeNA

Many said it would never happen, that the idea was sheer lunacy, that Nintendo would never capitulate to the mobile gaming market and release their beloved franchises onto mobile devices.

That idea was rendered obsolete with the announcement of Nintendo’s partnership with Japanese mobile games publisher, DeNA to bring “new gaming applications featuring Nintendo IP which [both companies] will develop specifically for smart devices.” CEO Isao Moriyasu commented in an interview with Reuters that the partnership should bring in $25 million and change a month.

As the Inquisitr has mentioned previously, the landmark announcement of Nintendo partnering with DeNA is part of an initiative to see historic Nintendo characters like Super Mario and Donkey Kong appear in new games developed in tandem for smart devices as well as a yet unnamed Nintendo hardware platform.

DeNA is indeed a publishing power house in the mobile games market. A cursory search in the iOS App Store for “DeNA” will give you games such as Marvel Mighty Heroes, Godus, and Star Wars: Galactic Defense. The company’s motto is “Delight and Impact the World,” and a partnership with Nintendo will arguably bring some of the most iconic characters in video game history to a population that loves to put expensive smart devices in the hands of their children as soon as possible.

How does DeNA plan to reach $25 million a month?

Moriyasu said, “We want to create games that will be played by hundreds of millions of people.”

With these millions of people, DeNA wants to topple one of the other giants in mobile gaming, Candy Crush, which still sits atop the gaming charts on mobile devices. To do this, Gamespot reported that DeNA would need to attract 100 million users… per day. Candy Crush reportedly peaked at 93 million daily active users in 2014.

DeNA and Nintendo have the potential to top the record of $25 million a month, which is currently held by game another DeNA game, Kaito Royale, a title that is receiving a TV series based on its success. No details on revenue sharing for the development and capital alliance has been disclosed by either company, but the analysts in the industry are forecasting a 70 percent revenue share for Nintendo, which would benefit the maker of the struggling Wii U.

Nintendo and DeNA are making manifest what investors have long called for Nintendo to do. While Japan’s culture is much more friendly to mobile gaming platforms such as the PS Vita and 3DS, North America is more heavily saturated with mobile devices that are putting out visuals comparable to the latest dedicated consoles.

While we do not know yet which Nintendo IP will be featured with this $25 million a month projected deal with DeNA, we will find out this year, as DeNA is hoping to deliver the first product of this alliance in 2015.

[Image Source | Stefano Tinti / Shutterstock.com]