Christopher Wallace: Criminal’s Snapchat Fail Leads Police Right To Him

Christopher Wallace, a 24-year-old wanted for burglary in central Maine, obligingly led police right to his hiding spot after posting his whereabouts on Snapchat.

Wallace’s initial crime was a fairly tame burglary, but even then, Wallace left a trail a mile wide for police to follow. According to the Bangor Daily News, the burglary that had taken place at a camping site back in January. Wallace allegedly stole a propane cook stove as well as a cast iron wood stove from a campsite. Wallace apparently never saw the game camera set up nearby, which captured him in the act. The footage from the game camera eventually led to an arrest warrant, but Wallace apparently decided to skip town.

Wallace had alluded capture from police since then, but on Sunday, campsite burglar Wallace posted on Snapchat that he was back in his home in Fairfield, Maine. And apparently Wallace doesn’t have as many friends as he thought he did, since tipsters quickly contacted the local police in order to inform the authorities that the stove-stealing fugitive was back in town.

Police entered the home, where Erika Hall, a 20-year-old female at the residence, repeatedly told them that Wallace wasn’t home and that she hadn’t seen him for weeks. And police themselves had yet to turn up Wallace during the search of his home either.

But then Wallace, apparently in an extremely helpful mood, posted on Snapchat for a second time, saying that the police were in his home searching for him, but hadn’t found him — because he was hiding in a cabinet.

Again, tips began flooding in, and Wallace was quickly found after police discovered a pair of feet among the pots, pans, and food items in the home’s cabinets.

The arrest was described in comic detail on the Somerset County Sheriff’s Department’s Facebook page.

“Last night, using the Snapchat app, Wallace posted that he was at his house in Fairfield, which prompted people to call the Sheriff’s Office. Corporal Ritchie Putnam, Deputy Ron Blodgett (from our agency), and two officers from Fairfield Police Department went to the residence. They were given permission to search the house, and initially they did not find Wallace. Here’s where things went bad for him…While the deputies/officers were wrapping up their search, Wallace posted again on Snapchat. This time he posted that the police were searching for him in the house, and that he was hiding in a cabinet. Again, we received phone calls. A search of the kitchen cabinets turned up some food, some pots and pans, and also a pair of feet. The pair of feet just so happened to be attached to a person, and that person was Christopher Wallace. He was removed from the cabinet, and placed under arrest. All of that, brings me to the moral of the story. Always remain humble, my friends.”

Wallace was charged with burglary, theft, and violation of conditions of release and was taken into custody. Erika Hall was also taken into custody from the residence. The Facebook post also explained the reason behind her arrest.

“Hall was arrested for hindering apprehension, because…well…let’s put it this way, when the police ask you multiple times if someone is in the house, and you answer repeatedly that they are not in the house, and that you have not seen said person in ‘weeks’, you’re just going to get arrested. That’s how it happens.”

Wallace is just one of many in a long line of dumb criminals whose actions have led to easy apprehensions by police. Click here to read about the man who called police because his cocaine had been stolen, or here to read about the murderers who used Google to find information on how to murder their victims.

[Image via Facebook]