Republican House Speaker Supports Aaron Schock’s Resignation Amid Scandals

Republican House Speaker John Boehner was shocked by the resignation of Illinois Representative Aaron Schock but said he supported Schock’s decision to resign following public scrutiny over his lavish spending.

Boehner told the National Journal he and the rest of America expect their representatives to be held to high ethical standards.

“Understand something: If somebody’s going to violate the rules, they’re gonna violate the rules. In almost every case, sooner or later, it catches up to you. Frankly, I support the decision he made.”

Former Congressman Aaron Schock’s Instagram account, in which Schock chronicled his flamboyant lifestyle, has been made private since his resignation, according to an Inquisitr report.

Photos of Schock’s travels on private planes and lavish office decorations were what fueled an investigation by the Office of Congressional Ethics.

Schock chronicled the redecorating of his office on the social media account, including pictures showing the office styled as something out of Downtown Abbey. The congressman also chronicled his trips on private jets and time hanging out with Hollywood stars.

Throughout his tenure, Schock also dodged rumors about his sexuality, although he has staunchly denied rumors he’s gay.

No stranger to the limelight, Schock appeared on the gossip site TMZ and later on the cover of Men’s Health, showing off his sculpted abs.

These photos, along with frankly candid interviews, helped paint a picture of the congressman as one of the Millennial generation instead of the stuffy old white man generally associated with Republicans.

Now, however, he has been forced to retire in shame after an embarrassing public scandal and allegations he used taxpayer money to fund his lavish lifestyle.

The Pantagraph published part of Schock’s resignation letter his office released Tuesday.

“I do this with a heavy heart. Serving the people of the 18th District is the highest and greatest honor I have had in my life. … But the constant questions over the last six weeks have proven a great distraction that has made it too difficult for me to serve the people of the 18th District with the high standards that they deserve and which I have set for myself.”

The 33-year-old will be leaving Congress with $3.3 million in campaign funds, according to the Pantagraph.

Federal law allows Schock to use the cash to pay legal bills, support other candidates, or give it to the GOP. He could also return the money to his donors or hang on to the money if he plans to run for office again.