Man’s Penis ‘Snaps’ While Having Sex

A 42-year-old man was treated at a Boston hospital in the spring of 2014 after he snapped his penis while having sex. The man broke his penis when he missed his aim and jammed his male member into his partner’s perineum instead of her vagina.

The perineum is the small space between the vagina and the anus.

According to a report published by the New England Journal of Medicine, the “snapping” sound that the man heard at the moment his penis broke was due to the fracturing of his tunica albuginea, a fibrous sheath that surrounds the inner part of the penis known as the corpora cavernosa.

Stiffening of the tunica albuginea during sexual stimulation produces the male erection.

The man felt a sharp agonizing pain when his penis broke and he watched in horror as blood began oozing out through the tip of penis as the entire organ filled with blood.

According to Dr. Robert J. Hartman, the escape of blood from the tunica albuginea into other spaces in the penis caused it to turn ghastly purple, swollen and deformed, as shown in this image of the penile fracture (Warning: NSFW) published in the Journal on Thursday.

“The penile ‘fracture’ refers to a tear in the tunica albuginea, the watertight fibrous outer sheath of the corpora cavernosa that is responsible for maintaining the structural integrity of an erection. Disruption of the tunica results in a loss of blood outside the corpora, causing a hematoma.”

The report in the New England Journal of Medicine described the bulbous deformation of the penis due to fracture of the tunica albuginea as the “classic eggplant deformity.”

“The classic eggplant deformity (swelling, discoloration, and deviation away from the defect in the tunica) can be seen.”

The man was rushed to the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston where doctors performed an emergency surgery to repair damage to the delicate organ.

Dr. Hartman described the surgical procedure to The Huffington Post.

“We ‘deglove’ the penis [by] essentially making a circumferential skin incision around the head of the penis. We then pull that skin all the way back to the base of the penis, exposing the erectile cylinders of the penis, as well as the urethra. This allows us to easily identify the injury — ‘the crack’ — in the cylinder and close it with stitches.”

According to the New England Journal of Medicine, the surgery to repair the “cylinder” machinery of the man’s penis was successful and the patient was released from hospital a day after the surgery. Doctors were able to correct the long-term effects of the injury, including erectile dysfunction, permanent disfigurement of the penis due to abnormal curvature and formation of plaque along its length.

Follow-up checkups over a period of six months confirmed that the man had regained his ability to acquire and maintain a viable erection “without appreciable plaque formation or penile curvature.”

“On the basis of the clinical presentation, the patient was taken to the operating room for emergency repair. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and was discharged from the hospital the morning after surgery. The patient was seen three months and six months after surgery and had regained erectile function without appreciable plaque formation or penile curvature.”

Plaque refers to scar tissue along the length of penis due to injury.

According to the Huffington Post, Dr. Hartman said that penile fractures are fairly common and that surgeons at the hospital’s urology unit see a case about “once every month or two.”

The Mirror notes that the incident comes after doctors at Kings College in London determined that the average size of the penis of British males was shorter than previously thought.

According to a report by Dr. David Veale of King’s College London and colleagues, latest analysis of data from 17 studies involving more than 15,000 British males reveals that the average length of the erect penis was 13.12 cm (5.16 inches), while the average length of the flaccid penis was 9.16 cm (3.6 inches).

[Image: Wikimedia Commons]