Revenge Porn King Hunter Moore Agrees To Guilty Plea In Los Angeles Court

Hunter Moore, the operator of a revenge porn website who posted the stolen nude photos, has agreed to a guilty plea, according to federal prosecutors. The Associated Press reported that court papers filed on Wednesday showed that Hunter Moore agreed to plead guilty for charges of hacking and identity theft.

Moore was dubbed as the “most hated man on the Internet” for running a revenge porn website that posted explicit photos of women without their consent, including those submitted by scorned ex-partners. Revenge porn is uploaded with the intention to embarrass or sexually harass the individual. Photos on the revenge porn site also included an American Idol finalist, the daughter of a well-known Republican donor, and a woman in a wheelchair.

There were also nude photos of Brandi Passante, a star of the A&E reality show Storage Wars. She sued Moore for defamation in Santa Ana federal court in 2012, according to My News LA.

Moore, 28, signed the court papers saying he paid Charles “Gary Jones” Evens $200 per week to hack into various women’s email accounts and steal nude photos, which were posted on his now-defunct revenge porn site IsAnyoneUp.com.

The revenge porn site drew attention from feminist groups and the media. Moore was also profiled in Rolling Stone magazine, which dubbed him the title of “the most hated man on the Internet.” He enjoyed the media attention, as he appeared on various talk shows hosted by Anderson Cooper and Dr. Drew Pinsky.

Evens, 26, also pleaded not guilty and is scheduled to trial for next month. Moore is scheduled to appear in court on Feb. 25, but his court date may be delayed until March.

Moore will face a two-year prison sentence, and a maximum of seven years, according to NBC News. He will also face the possibility of $500,000 in fines and three years of supervised release. Moore will also be prohibited from using computer equipment without notifying authorities first.

Last year, the Inquisitr reported that nine victims of the revenge porn site took Moore into custody. Both Moore and Evens were arrested in charges of conspiracy, unauthorized access to a protected computer to obtain information, and aggravated identify theft linked to the revenge porn website. Is Anyone Up has been down since April, 2012, when anti-bullying group Bullyville bought the domain from Moore, who admitted to his wrongdoings.

The Cyber Civil Rights Initiative created a campaign against revenge porn in August, 2012. The group also considers this cyber crime a form of sexual abuse. Holly Jacobs found the website endrevengeporn.org to host petitions with the intention of criminalizing revenge porn.

The Moore-Evens indictment list also dates back to mid October, 2011, in which Moore exchanged emails with Evens on how to hack email accounts and to offer him weekly payment via an anonymous PayPal account.

What are your thoughts on Hunter Moore’s plea deal and the revenge porn industry?

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