Dick Vitale Claims He Was Hacked After NSFW Tweet

Dick Vitale, also known as “Dickie V,” an American basketball sportscaster known for his catchphrases and colorful remarks, sent a tweet from his official Twitter account that appeared unsafe for work (NSFW). SBNation captured the Twit-slip as they published a screen shot of the now missing tweet.

Dick Vitale Twit Slip
Dick Vitale's NSFW Twit-slip.

The account name, as seen in the screen shot of the accidental tweet, contains a bad word. What happened here, according to SBNation is no more than a simple misplaced click on an item listed by Twitter’s auto-suggestion feature. The report indicates that he must have meant to link to First Watch cafe, not the offensive NSFW account. The report went on to say that hackers “don’t post normal, sweet stuff on your account with slightly profane typos” and that it was “okay” to make a mistake.

Sporting News said that the issue was that he claimed he was a hacking victim instead of making an apology and moving on.

While the tweet appeared to have been made in error, Vitale followed up with a tweet indicating that someone had hacked his Twitter account and to disregard the hacker’s perverted, sick attitude.

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Richard John “Dick” Vitale was born in Passaic, New Jersey in 1939. According to Wikipedia he’s known for his catchphrases, which include “diaper dandy” and “baby,” as well as his remarks made during games. He’s authored nine books and made appearances in several movies. Formerly, Vitale was employed as a head coach in both college basketball as well as the NBA.

Vitale took up his first coaching position at an elementary school in Garfield, New Jersey, back in 1959 and eventually moved up to the high school level where he became the head coach at Garfield High School. He eventually moved to Rutgers University in 1971 where he worked as an assistant coach under what was then head coach Dick Lloyd. After a couple of seasons, he was hired by the University of Detroit in 1973 where he became the head coach and later took the school on a 21-game winning streak in which his team reached the NCAA tournament of 1977.

In professional years, Vitale eventually coached the NBA’s Detroit Pistons from 1978 to 1979 where he lead them to a 30-52 record. After coaching the Pistons, he was given his first television opportunity by Scotty Connal at what was the then a fledgling ESPN network. While he was reluctant to accept the position, his wife encouraged him and he eventually accepted on a temporary basis until another coaching job became available.

ESPN’s Dickie Vitale accidentally said, “They love their hoes, they love ’em here” instead of saying “wahoos,” SB Nation reported.

Do you think Dickie’s Twitter was hacked or did he simple make an auto-fill style mistake?

[Image via Wikimedia Commons]