The BBC Stoops To New Low With Openly Anti-Semitic Reporting From Paris Anti-Terror Rally

While it’s no secret that the BBC and the New York Times are no friends of Israel, BBC reporter Tim Willcox took the news corporation to a new low during his interview with a Jewish woman in Paris following the Kosher supermarket massacre last week.

During the Paris anti-terror rally, which drew crowds in their millions, the BBC reporter virtually ambushed the Jewish woman. He started by asking how she felt about the situation for Jews in France at the moment.

The woman answered that she felt like the atmosphere in the country was reminiscent of 1930’s Europe, just before 6 million Jews were sent to their deaths by the Nazis and their collaborators.

To that reasonable portrayal of life for Jews in France, Willcox seemed to go temporarily insane, crossing all boundaries of reporting etiquette by using the interview to bash Israel, vis-a-vis, the conflict with the Palestinians.

As Willcox said to the unassuming woman, “Many critics though of Israel’s policy would suggest that the Palestinians suffer hugely at Jewish hands as well.”

The woman clearly felt uncomfortable by the non-related question and seemed in some shock, not knowing quite how to answer.

What does the brutal slaying of four innocent Jewish shoppers in a Paris Kosher supermarket have to do with the complex, decades-old Israeli-Palestinian conflict? There are many people all over the world who are aggrieved about something, Bosnians, Indians, Tibetans, the list is almost endless. That doesn’t mean that those upset people go ahead and carry out brutal massacres of innocent people many miles away from the source of the conflict.

Yet, Willcox, in his unprofessional and totally biased manner, managed to add two and two to make five, by relating the conflict in Israel to the massacres in France. Based on that logic, one should be understanding if a native American carries out a a similar massacre of innocent people, due to the fact he had his land stolen by white, Europeans.

Or perhaps Willcox would ask an innocent British person in London, following a massacre on Oxford Street carried out by an angry Argentinian upset about the British occupation of the Falkand Islands, near the coast of Argentina, if they can understand why that person carried out the attack due to the fact that “Argentinians suffer hugely at British hands as well.”

For that matter, perhaps the next time Tim Willcox, or any BBC reporter, has the honor to interview the Turkish President, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, they will ask him what he intends to do about his country’s occupation of Cyprus, an occupation which is illegal and in contravention of numerous U.N. resolutions.

The point here is how is it normal to even connect a vicious and brutal massacre in Paris to the complexities of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, a conflict which has endured for more than 50 years?

Indeed, the likes of Tim Willcox, and others, seem to have stooped to new lows when it comes to biased and skewed reporting, bringing disgrace, not only on themselves, but to the media world in general.