FBI Director Indicates North Korea Undoubtedly Behind Sony Hack [Video]

Speaking to an audience at the International Conference on Cyber Security hosted at Fordham University, the FBI director said that the hackers behind the attack on Sony sought to route their connections through proxy servers in order to mask their origins. However, they “got sloppy” and “connected directly” from IP addresses used exclusively by North Korea.

The movie at the center of the hack, The Interview, cost $44 million to make and has almost broken even, having already recouped $36 million in less than two weeks since its release.

Inquisitr has been following this story since its inception. In an earlier report we published back in December, we said that “since the FBI declared North Korea responsible for the cyber attack on Sony Pictures Entertainment, everyone from amateur sleuths to U.S. senators are casting doubt on North Korean involvement.”

Yet another report published on Inquisitr back in December regarding this incident indicated that the culprit may have been an insider.

“Security experts have looked into the possibility that someone inside Sony was behind the attack since the beginning as well. […] Marc W. Rogers, an expert hacker and cyber security pro, thought that a disgruntled Sony employee was behind the hack. […] Kurt Stammberger agrees that an employee was behind the attack on Sony Entertainment.”

The Associated Press reported on December 20 that the FBI had discovered computer Internet addresses, IP addresses, known to be operated by North Korea were communicating directly with computers used in the attack. These computers were used to collect stolen data from Sony and to control and deploy the hacking tools used in the breach of Sony’s systems.

Comey called this “a mistake by them” which “made it very clear who was doing this.” He went onto say, “I have very high confidence about this attribution to North Korea, as does the entire intelligence community.” He also indicated that the attack on Sony had “clear links” to malware which had been developed by North Korea, as the same tools were used in an attack on South Korean banks and media outlets which took place last year.

Regardless of accusations, North Korea has denied involvement in hacking Sony’s systems.

Who do you think is behind the Sony hack?