Paul Allen Contributes $100M To Start A Cell Research Institute

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen’s donation of $100 million was in the hopes of starting a new cell research institution to help battle diseases.

This is not the first time Paul Allen has been in the news recently. According to a report from the Inquisitr, Paul Allen has announced plans to build a spaceship that could replace the Space Shuttle this decade.

Paul Allen’s donation will create the Allen Institute for Cell Science, and it will investigate and research the complex inner workings of cells. “Scientists have learned a great deal about many of the 50 trillion cells in our bodies over the last decades, but creating a comprehensive, predictive model of the cell will require a different approach,” said Allen’s statement.

“Cells are the fundamental units of life, with every disease we know of affecting particular types of cells,” said Allen, in a press release from the new center. “We conceived of the Allen Institute for Cell Science as a catalyzing force to integrate technologies and approaches at a large scale in order to provide an exceptional resource for the entire scientific community.”

Paul Allen’s donation could help battle many diseases which affect the body on a cellular level. The money would go towards bringing information from both cellular and molecular sciences to delve deeper into the cell. “As we have learned more about the enormous complexity of cell chemistry in recent years, it has become clear that we will need both new types of data and new computational tools to understand even the simplest living cells,” says Bruce Alberts, prominent cell scientist at the University of California, who is serving as an adviser to the institute.

Aside from cell research, Allen has donated another $100 million to fight Ebola in West Africa. His Allen Institute for Brain Science has already received $500 million from Paul Allen. Over his entire life, Paul Allen has already given away $1.5 billion to various charities.

Paul Allen’s donation for cell research has been well received. “These longer-term kinds of investments tend to be neglected because everyone wants short-term outputs,” biochemist Bruce Alberts, who met with Allen earlier this year, told the Washington Post. “I am very pleased Paul Allen has a different vision.”

His new institution will be based in Seattle.

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