Apparently ‘Denying Sex’ Is A Form of Sexual Violence Too, If You Study At The University of Michigan

Colleges have always been accused of mishandling cases of sexual violence and abuse. These institutions of knowledge have been dealing with a barrage of issues regarding unwarranted physical intimacy between its students, on and off campus. However, the University of Michigan recently had its policy on sexual violence scrutinized and ridiculed for its rather strange context about the topic.

Since the circumstances leading to sex and the act itself are rather tricky to prove, no wonder colleges have always found it difficult to frame policies and rules that define this delicate topic that alarmingly comes across the board quite frequently than one would expect. The University of Michigan might have faced a similar dilemma and its efforts to make a comprehensive policy on sexual violence, went ahead formulated the following context.

“Examples of sexual violence include: discounting the partner’s feelings regarding sex; criticizing the partner sexually; touching the partner sexually in inappropriate and uncomfortable ways; withholding sex and affection; always demanding sex; forcing partner to strip as a form of humiliation (maybe in front of children), to witness sexual acts, to participate in uncomfortable sex or sex after an episode of violence, to have sex with other people; and using objects and/or weapons to hurt during sex or threats to back up demands for sex.”

[Emphasis added]

It has always been assumed that choosing not to have sex, was everyone’s prerogative. But this policy suggests that under some circumstances, a partner is actually entitled to sex, reported The Daily Caller. Even preliminary reading an intent requirement into the policy, it translates that if a student’s decision not to have sex with his or her partner, is motivated by a desire to make that partner feel bad, then that choice is invalid and potentially punishable.

In summation, at the University of Michigan there theoretically exists, some circumstances in which not consenting to sex, is against the rules, reported The Huffington Post.

Isn’t refraining from sex, one of the basic advices that parents give their kids when they go to college? Does this overboard policy allow for selective enforcement and disciplinary action against students who haven’t done anything morally or legally wrong? Moreover, is anyone actually entitled to sex? In the recent past the Inquisitr had reported about how CPS had been hounding a woman who left her kids alone at home for merely 20 minutes. Are such rules equally subjective and judgmental?

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