Stevie Nicks Opens Up About Cocaine Use, Her Pregnancy With Don Henley’s Baby, And Growing Older

Stevie Nicks has some wild stories about her life and she shared some of them last week in an interview with Billboard.

The 66-year-old rock icon opened up about her past in an interview about her current tour with Fleetwood Mac and the release of her new album due out October 7, 24 Karat Gold – Songs From the Vault.

Nicks admitted that a doctor once told her in the 80s that if she had one more line of cocaine, she would have a brain hemorrhage. She referred to a documentary she watched on Mabel Normand, the inspiration for one of her songs, which also inspired her to break her habit. Normand was a cocaine addicted actress and comedian from the 20s. Nicks says she really connected with Normand’s story during her struggle with cocaine addiction.

“I saw a documentary of her in 1985, when I was at my lowest point with the blow. I was watching TV one night, the movie came on, and I really felt a connection with her. That’s when I wrote the song. Less than a year later, I went to rehab at Betty Ford.”

“The documentary really scared me,” she said. “Because I saw this beautiful girl go downhill so fast. Sometimes you can’t see it in yourself, but you sure as heck can see it in someone else.”

Stevie also confirmed the story told by Don Henley, who Us Magazine reports she dated in the late 70s for a brief time after splitting with Lindsey Buckingham, that Nicks had gotten pregnant by him and named the unborn baby Sara. Henley claims their unborn child was the inspiration for the Fleetwood Mac song, “Sara.”

Nicks decided to terminate the pregnancy, but admitted that had she would have chosen that name if she’d had the baby and it had been a girl. But she said that wasn’t the only influence. There was another woman in her life at the time, Mick Fleetwood’s soon to be wife, Sara.

When asked why she hadn’t written a memoir on her interesting life, Nicks told Billboard the world wasn’t ready for her memoir.

“Because I wouldn’t be able to tell the whole truth. The world is not ready for my memoir, I guarantee you. All of the men I hung out with are on their third wives by now, and the wives are all under 30. If I were to write what really happened between 1972 and now, a lot of people would be very angry with me. It’ll happen some day, just not for a very long time. I won’t write a book until everybody is so old that they no longer care. Like, ‘I’m 90, I don’t care what you write about me.'”

“I cannot throw any of them under the bus until I absolutely know that they will not care,” Stevie said.

Referring to some old pictures she looked at while searching for artwork for the new album, Nicks also commented on growing older and her perception of herself when she was younger.

“Part of me is feeling extremely old now, and part of me is feeling extremely young. Because I look at these pictures and realize I worried about things that I shouldn’t have been worrying about. I wouldn’t go out to the beach without a sarong from my neck to my ankles. Now I see a picture of myself from that era in a bikini and I’m like, ‘You looked great. And you missed out on a lot of fun vacations, because you were so sure that you were fat.'”

“Spend more time in a bikini!” she advised younger women. “Oh, just get ready for what’s to come.”

Stevie Nicks fans can read about more about her in this Inqusitr article, in which she discusses new music and her gay fan base.

[Image via communities.washingtontimes.com]