Chapstick Banned In Public Schools, Burt And His Bees To Be Next?

Chapstick is the latest victim of the ever expanding list of things you can not have in public schools. In a similar incident, with something more edible than Chapstick, cupcakes were banned from a public school.

This of course has been one item, in a long line of products being banned in public schools in the US.

The Inquisitr recently reported on a few such things.

A disturbing trend has emerged, most of it having started through Michelle Obama's 'healthy' school lunch initiative, birthday cupcakes are being banned at alarming rate. It started with an innocent peanut butter and jelly sandwich being confiscated. School lunches of healthy chicken nuggets replacing "disgusting, unhealthy turkey sandwiches" that parents should be ashamed of. Cupcake bans have been the latest attempt to save children from their evil, selfish parents who care little for other children's allergies, let alone the health of their own.
It is unclear what is the driving force behind these bans on the whole, but most consider them to be peaking at the height of absurdity. In the most recent instance, of public schools gone wild, Chapstick is the latest casualty.

The Chapstick ban is part of the policy in Stuarts Draft Elementary in Craigsville, Virginia. Reason reported on the zero-tolerance policy held by the school.

George Earhart, the assistant superintendent for administration with the Augusta County Schools, said Chapstick is considered an over-the-counter medication by the school board. The board has a policy regarding such medicines. He said Chapstick could be allowed if a physician asked for a student to use it, and it was administered by a school nurse.

Earhart said one of the reasons for the policy is concerns about elementary students sharing medications.

The Chapstick issue was brought to the school's attention by an 11-year old student, who was suffering from chapped lips and dared request for the Chapstick whilst playing on the playground.

The News Virginian recounted the incident.

I was told I couldn't use it. Then later that day they (lips) started to bleed so I asked for Chapstick again and I was told that it was against the school policy for elementary kids to have Chapstick.
The 11-year old student Grace Karaffa explained why she felt it was necessary to change the Chapstick policy.
Chapstick allows the human body to heal the lips themselves and protects them in any weather from drying out.
Grace concluded her speech with a simple plea to the school board at the meeting last Thursday.
Please school board, allow us to have Chapstick.
Though it is unclear if her impassioned plea to reverse the odious Chapstick ban will work, the assistant superintendent made a statement, according to The News Virginian.
He said the student's request was taken under advisement by the school board. The school administration will communicate with the Karaffa family and could also report back to the school board.
It is clear that "Chapstick" is currently banned, but what about Burt's Bees? The natural Chapstick brand that was under controversy for the alleged beezin' craze.

So, is it beezin' that has the school is bannin', or is something more sinister? Perhaps, it is just sheer nonsense. What are your thoughts?

[ Images Via Wikimedia Commons ]