‘Shark Tank’ Parodied By MAD Magazine: Check Out The ‘Snark Tank’

Shark Tank gets the MAD magazine treatment in issue 529, on newsstands tomorrow. As Zap2It says, the parody is not kind, but “fairly accurate.” The spread features artistic renderings of the “sharks” along with two groups of would-be entrepreneurs.

In ghost-like form are famous inventors from history, who’ve achieved monumental success on the basis of that one great idea. Steve Jobs and Nikola Tesla appear to be among them. The pitchers who are looking for an investment are hawking less-than-earth-shattering inventions: an invisible umbrella and a vacuum cleaner so powerful it can suck up a person.

MAD Parodies 'Shark Tank'
'Shark Tank' Parody in MAD Magazine Issue 529 (Text: Dick Debartolo Coloring: Tom Richmond)

As for the biting parodies of the sharks themselves, MAD magazine creators pull no punches. The rewritten mini-bios of each entrepreneur range from a mild tease to jokes about unethical behavior. Of course, each of the “sharks” are re-named; so when one entrepreneur says that “while taking lunch orders from top-notch stockbrokers, I wrote down their insider trading secrets,” it’s attributed not to Barbara Corcoran, but rather, “Brabra Corkyourman.”

“Kevin O’Greedy” says he is a modest man, and that’s why he claims on his tax return the business he sold for a few billion dollars is only worth $800,000. “Lordi Greenears” is, like Lori Greiner, associated with QVC – except in the MAD version that’s “Queen of Valueless Crap.” “Robber Hurtyaback” says his wealth has allowed him to buy off politicians.

In comparison, “Diamond John” and “Marked Clubbin” got off pretty easy. John made his money in urban apparel, which according to “Diamond” is “code for morons who happily pay $60 for a t-shirt.” “Marked” says his incredible profits of 1,000-2,000 percent come from “the concession stands in the stadiums and the theatres.”

Of course, the MAD parody is not the first time the Shark Tank investors have been put under the microscope. In September 2012, The Globe and Mail published an extensive feature on Kevin O’Leary dramatically titled “Kevin O’Leary: He’s not a billionaire, he just plays one on tv.” The piece ran through the complicated details of his much-lauded sale of a software company worth several billion dollars.

The Shark Tank program itself has been subject to deeper scrutiny of late, as its popularity has led hoards of would-be entrepreneurs to try to secure a spot on the show. As previously reported by The Inquisitr, pitchers endure a lengthy and detailed application process and even if their pitch is successful, they risk the deal’s failure to close off-air.

MAD Magazine is owned by DC Entertainment, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company. Shark Tank will return to ABC in the fall.

[Images: MAD Magazine/Shark Tank/ABC]