Brazil Coach, Luiz Felipe Scolari Out After Humiliating End To World Cup Bid

The news comes as no surprise. Brazil’s coach, Luiz Felipe Scolari is out, following the humiliating manner in which the host of the 2014 World Cup exited, what was supposed to be their shining moment in front of their loyal fans.

Instead, the last two matches of their campaign were a disaster. There is no other word to summarize what Brazil — one of the biggest superpowers in football and five-times World Cup winner — went through, from the time Germany had a party, walking all over them in the infamous 7-1 match, to the third place match against the Netherlands, which only served to continue the bleeding.

It was logical to think that Scolari would either quit or be canned. Even though for any team, getting to fourth place in a World Cup would be considered a successful bid, not so for Brazil, especially not at home.

The 2014 World Cup was expected to be the chance Brazil had to avenge that game from long ago, the Maracanazo. The worst loss the national football team — or so they thought — had ever suffered. In 1950, the nation was shocked to its core, when Uruguay, one of their biggest rivals, defeated Brazil in the final to take the title.

The announcement of the dismissal of Luiz Felipe Scolari came late Monday, the day after the World Cup final, in which Germany defeated Argentina 1-0, with a late goal in extra time. The Brazilian Football Confederation announced Scolari’s resignation on Monady.

When Scolari came on to coach Brazil — for the second time — he promised to win the World Cup with this team. However, after the worst loss in Brazil’s team illustrious 100-years history, Scolari took responsibility for the disastrous result. The nation and the world were in shock at what they were witnessing, when Germany was able to score five-goals within less than 20 minutes.

Scolari coached Brazil’s team to a World Cup title in 2002, but resigned shortly thereafter. He was later hired in 2012, winning the 2013 Confederations Cup, after defeating Uruguay and Spain.

Manuel Pellegrini — the Manchester City coach — was one of the names floating around as possible replacement for Luiz Felipe Scolari, however the Chilean coach said that he is not interested in entering into negotiations with the Brazilians and wants to stay at his post.

Brazil will, no doubt, go through a revision of their program to try and determine the reasons for the catastrophic implosion of its World Cup team under Luiz Felipe Scolari’s direction. Making matters worse, they weren’t able to put behind them the Maracanazo of 1950 and now have the 7-1 loss, which Scolari called the “worst day of his life”, to live with.

[Image via Twitter]