Nude Photos Of Girlfriend, Sexting Now Illegal In Germany Due To Revenge Porn Law

Revenge Porn Law

Thinking of getting revenge on your ex by selling off nude photos of your girlfriend? Well, Germany just made that particular act of revenge illegal after they passed a law specifically targeting revenge porn.

In a related report by The Inquisitr, the United States is also trying to pass a revenge porn bill that would outlaw the practice. Senator Jones explained of the proposed legislation in a statement:

“This is an attempt to stop cyber revenge – usually the actions of a former lover to intimidate or harass their ex-partner or to damage their reputation. This breach of trust is a growing problem in America that affects both men and women. I will do everything I can to stop this, because everyone deserves to have their privacy protected – especially in their own home.”

In the case of Germany, a woman had brought a case before the courts where she was demanding that her boyfriend, who happens to be a photographer, delete all clothed and nude photos of his girlfriend. In addition, they had made multiple erotic videos of themselves and now that they were split she wanted it all deleted.

Well, the German court ruled in favor of the woman, saying that she had the right to demand that the girlfriend’s porn be deleted because personal rights were more important than his ownership rights to the explicit materials. The only caveat is that the court would not allow her to delete the photos where she was wearing clothing since these photos have “little, if any capacity” to compromise her privacy rights.

Viktor Mayer-Schönberger, a professor of internet governance and regulation at Oxford University, explained what the ruling means for the larger picture on the internet:

“The Koblenz decision was not about data protection but the ‘right for one’s own image’, which is a special construction of continental European jurisprudence. But what can be said is that is that these two rulings may make more and more people aware of their personal rights in the digital sphere. At the very least, it should embolden future claimants who pro-actively want to prevent revenge porn.”

Christian Solmecke, a German lawyer who has worked on revenge porn cases, says that changing laws could make things difficult for divorced people:

“We can detect a wider trend here. In the future we may increasingly find that images or data whose publication was lawful at the time may have to be deleted as circumstances change.”

Do you think the United States should adopt privacy laws where nude photos of girlfriends and boyfriends belong to the person whose body is being shown?