Chuck Norris Throws Down The Gauntlet To Government Over Care Of Vets

When Chuck Norris speaks, he expects to be listened to. This time his challenge is to the United States government about the treatment of veterans who have laid it all on the line to fight for our freedom.

J.D. Gordon, retired Navy Commander, has just revealed the bombshell to FOX that “Al Qaeda detainees get better medical treatment than our veterans.” In his position as a Pentagon spokesman in the Office of the Secretary of Defense from 2005-09, Gordon visited Guantanamo Bay Naval Base over 30 times. Gordon says that there is a 1.5 to 1 ratio of health care providers to Gitmo detainees, compared to a 35 to 1 ratio of veterans to VA employees.

The media has been full of stories reporting on the long wait times for veterans for medical treatment, and vets who have died while waiting to be seen. Access to care has been greatly delayed, and CNN reports allegations of creative cooking of the books to make it appear that appointments are scheduled within the recommended 14 to 30 days, while the reality for many veterans is much longer. Sometimes, says the New York Times, vets have had to wait more than 100 days for appointments for specialty care.

Chuck Norris is not happy about it. That doesn’t bode well for the administration.

The iconic Hollywood star of martial arts action films and Walker, Texas Ranger is possibly best known for the memes about his legendary status, according to a previous article by The Inquisitr. Memes of Chuck Norris abound that indicate that he is very serious when he speaks.

Before Chuck Norris took his incredible martial arts moves to Hollywood, he served in the United States Air Force. Norris himself is a veteran who served in Korea. He lost his younger brother, Wieland Clyde Norris, in the Vietnam War. The younger Norris had not even been in Vietnam for six weeks on his tour with the Army when he came under enemy fire and was killed.

Perhaps that fuels Chuck Norris’ passion for justice for veterans.

Black-belt-turned-literary-warrior, Norris writes columns that appear in WorldNet Daily, and in his latest piece, Chuck Norris shares a heart-rending story of an Afghan combat veteran, Kryn Miner, who suffered from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder from his experiences in his 11 deployments over seven years. A tragic series of events took his life after he returned home, but his wife, Amy, says that “it wouldn’t have happened if the U.S. government were as eager to care for veterans as it is to deploy them overseas in battle.”

Chuck Norris throws down the gauntlet to the government, and he calls upon the administration to, at the very least, “ensure that they have proper health care when they return from the battlefields.”

Then Norris goes further, to call upon American citizens to do the job that the government is failing to do adequately. Chuck Norris writes:

“But if the U.S. government won’t properly care for every last service member who risked it all, then we the people can – one at a time. Let us start with those in our own families, neighborhoods and communities. Extend (another) hand of gratitude and express your appreciation for those who serve our country. Befriend a veteran. Help veterans’ families. Give to groups such as the Wounded Warrior Project.”

The men and women who have put everything on the line deserve to have the best treatment that this country has to offer. Instead they are forced to wait far too long for care, often at risk to their lives.

Chuck Norris expects the US government to do a better job taking care of its veterans. So do the American people. Don’t you think it would be a good idea for them to listen to him? After all, he IS Chuck Norris.