Conspiracy Theory Blossoms That Maroon Flowers Is An A&M Prank

Maroon-colored bluebonnets sprouting at the University of Texas is now the primary point of a conspiracy theory. Are the maroon flowers the work of University of Texas rival, Texas A&M?

According to ABC Local, flower beds that grow bluebonnets at the University of Texas, are now home to a variant known as the Alamo fire, which is a shade of maroon. The conspiracy comes in because Texas A&M’s colors are white and maroon. Speculation is now brought up since students and staff members think Texas A&M students are responsible for sprinkling Alamo fire seeds on campus. As for the variant itself, Texas A&M horticulturists developed the maroon variety in the 80s in an attempt to plant a floral Texas flag honoring the state’s sesquicentennial. They spent two decades isolating pink bluebonnets from blue but failed to achieve a solid shade of red.

Alamo Fire and Regular Bluebonnets

Previously, one or two Alamo fire bluebonnets have blossomed within recent years. Markus Hogue, the University of Texas’s irrigation and water conservation coordinator, had this to say to the Houston Chronicle:

“Some find it cute. Others say it they get too much, they want them removed.”

However, nobody is taking credit for the Alamo fire bluebonnets, according to an article by The Examiner. But it is recognized that they didn’t get there by themselves. Theses genetically-modified flowers are no longer just one or two, but surrounding the tower and spreading to the point that maroon is becoming overwhelming. It has the look and feel and definitely one of the colors of Texas A&M, but nobody is sure if this is really the case.

The rivalry between the University of Texas and Texas A&M ended in 2011, when Texas A&M left the Big 12 behind for the SEC. While it should be over, this century-old rivalry may not be quick to die. Hogue then made another statement about how fast the Alamo fire bluebonnets spread:

“It’s definitely going to get worse. They are going to keep multiplying.”

“It is just a weird coincidence that the only place that we have them on campus that we know of is right by the (university) tower.”

It doesn’t help that Daphine Richards, a Texas A&M horticulturist, said that Alamo fire bluebonnets rarely show up unless they are intentionally seeded. Does that mean Texas A&M are really the ones behind this? Nevertheless if they are or not, Texas A&M now has to stay on high-alert because retaliation from the University of Texas may be imminent.

[Images via Bing]