PS4 Vs Xbox One: Next Gen Consoles Not As Impressive As Intended

The PS4 vs Xbox One console war is about to come to a conclusion as Microsoft’s machine finally reaches its release date. Compared to previous console wars, however, the reception on both sides has dipped into lukewarm.

Sony and Microsoft both had ambitious plans to make their next gen consoles the best we’ve ever seen, but in fact, we’ve seen it all before. As much as they boast revolutionary changes, it’s all really just an upgrade from what we already owned.

Sony went the minimalist route this time, focusing on the games themselves and not trying to push for an all-encompassing entertainment system. In a way, they succeeded, but due to alleged sabotage by Chinese “slave labor,” many PlayStation 4 gamers are still waiting for Sony to fix what is wrong with their console. Even though the console is already out, more than enough people have been disappointed by the quality control. They will probably have to wait until after the holidays to even play the games they bought.

The DualShock 4 boasts a clickable touch pad, which seems like a plus until you realize almost nothing makes it necessary yet. Some games support it, but with the PS4’s lacking a library of titles, that’s not much consolation.

On the other side of the PS4 vs Xbox One next gen console war, Microsoft’s console did almost everything it was supposed to. However, like nearly every new piece of technology, it could take a while to fix everything that doesn’t quite work right.

The recent Xbox One review roundup here on The Inquisitr pointed out that there were some firmware glitches that caused crashes and lockups on potentially system-breaking apps. This isn’t anything a firmware update can’t fix, but it just shows us that this is one console war we’re better off waiting out.

Another example of how the next gen consoles are simply upgrades to what we’ve already been using for almost a decade is the Xbox One’s TV streaming. Xbox 360 did that using AT&T’s Uverse, and the Xbox One’s native TV service doesn’t seem to work at all, according to Mercury News.

One aspect that both of the next gen consoles seem to share is the ability to use a smartphone or tablet (or in Sony’s case, the PS Vita) as a remote. This isn’t entirely new either, since the PSP was able to do that with the PlayStation 3.