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Martin Scorsese Project With Mick Jagger Seems Headed To HBO

Martin Scorsese Project With Mick Jagger Seems Headed To HBO

Martin Scorsese has been working for three years on a television project with Mick Jagger, and now it seems that the rock and roll series is finally headed to HBO.

The television drama follows producer Richie Finestra (Bobby Cannavale) as he searches for new talent while working for a major New York record label. The show is set in 1977, when New York saw both the waning days of disco as well as the birth of both punk music and hip-hop.

The new rock and roll project come as the result of a conversation between Jagger and Martin Scorsese. Mick reportedly told the Oscar-winning director that he should come up with a drama to the tune of Casino but set within the music industry.

Martin Scorsese, who is set to direct the first episode, has been working on and off with Mick Jagger on the project for a number of years but the busy schedules of the two stars made progress difficult. But the project has been picking up steam in recent months, first with the addition of Cannavale in the lead role and now this week with two experienced showrunners joining in.

Brian Koppelman and David Levien, who wrote Oceans 13 and Players, will serve as showrunners if HBO gives the pilot the greenlight. They have already been working on the pilot script from Terence Winter, and shooting is scheduled for early next year.

Koppelman seems especially fitted for the show. He worked as an A&R executive for nine years, spending time with Elektra Records, Giant Records, SBK Records, and EMI Records. He’s even credited with discovering singer/songwriter Tracy Chapman.

Koppelman has also worked with both Scorsese and Mick Jagger before on the Rolling Stones documentary Shine A Light.

Though the Martin Scorsese project hasn’t been formally approved yet, industry experts believe that’s just a formality now that Koppelmen and Levien have been added.

[Image via DFree / Shutterstock.com]

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