Lemonade stand lets Vivienne Harr help end child slavery

Lemonade Stand Earns Girl Over $100,000 Against Child Slavery

A lemonade stand in California earned a girl over $100,000 against child slavery.

A young girl, only eight years old at the time, took a simple idea and made a fortune with it. After seeing a picture of two child slaves in Nepal, Vivienne Harr told her mother it was time to make a stand. She pictured herself and her little brother as slaves and dedicated a lemonade stand to raising money to help end child slavery. With the help of her father, a successful online marketer, the story had begun.

After only a year in business, Vivienne Harr has moved on past the lemonade stand, but only to perpetuate the business even further. The idea was that she would take the one thing she was good at making, pink lemonade, and sell it at an unset price.

Inspired by advertising slogans she had seen everywhere asking customers to only pay what they want, she adopted the principle and it took off. Hence Make A Stand Lemon-Aid was born, and half of the profits go toward charities dedicated to ending child slavery. Such charities include the Nepal Youth Foundation, Free the Slaves, LeTot Center in Dallas, United Way, and the Mayor’s Fund in New York for the victims of Hurricane Sandy.

The other half of the profits go toward salaries and production costs. The Harr family doesn’t keep a dime of it. Vivienne Harr worked every single day for a year to earn the money through her lemonade stand, never taking a day off, though once she went to New York City at Mayor Bloomberg’s request to sell the lemonade in Times Square.

Make A Stand Lemon-Aid profits go to end child slavery
Make A Stand Lemon-Aid profits go to end child slavery

The Harr family plans in September to meet the two Nepalese boys who inspired Vivienne Harr to begin selling Make A Stand Lemon-Aid.After hearing about the lemonade stand, Joe Molsberry, owner of Molsberry Markets in Sonoma, California, started selling for them in his stores. The price remained unchanged as customers are still encouraged only to pay what they want. The suggested price is $2.99 a bottle, but some customers have paid up to $50 for a case.

What do you think of Vivienne Harr’s lemonade stand earning over $100,000 to end child slavery?

Comments