Nuclear Option

Nuclear Option Avoided By Senate

The nuclear option was avoided by the US Senate as a tentative deal has been reached. The compromise will allow President Obama’s nominations to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the National Labor review to move forward.

The nuclear option, also called the constitutional option, would have essentially changed long-standing Senate rules. The rule change would have confirmed presidential nominees with a simple majority vote, disregarding the traditional confirmation process.

As reported by NBC News, the compromise began with a vote to approve the president’s nomination of Richard Cordray as head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. His nomination was confirmed in a 71-29 vote.

Following the decision, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid stated that he will continue working toward further compromise:

“We may have a way forward on this… I feel fairly confident, but as you know, that’s why we need the time… It is a compromise, and I think we get what we want, and they get what they want.”

As reported by USA Today, Senator Charles Schumer, of New York, is pleased with the negotiations. He explains that the nuclear option would have caused “an Armageddon” within the Senate. He further points out that the negotiations may help facilitate “continued and more bipartisan cooperation in the Senate.”

The compromise will likely cover the remaining nominations, However, neither party is willing to agree to a long-term commitment. Reid may be willing to forgo the nuclear option in the future, if Republicans agree not to filibuster executive nominations.

That is a compromise neither leader is willing to make at this time.

Reid credits Senator John McCain for easing the potentially volatile situation. Reid states that “John McCain is the reason why we’re at the point we are.”

By avoiding the nuclear option, the Senate should be able to move forward. With any luck, they will continue to work together in the best interest of all US citizens.

[Image via Wikipedia]

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