Darrelle Revis Trade Sends Ripples Throughout League

Darrelle Revis Trade Sends Ripples Throughout League

The Darrelle Revis trade, completed Sunday sending the New York Jets cornerback to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, will have ripple effects that should reach well beyond both teams involved.

The Jets and Bucs agreed to the trade on Sunday, sending Revis to the Bucs in exchange for draft picks. The teams had been reportedly working out details over the course of several weeks, finally reaching a conclusion on Sunday.

There was still some hesitation as to whether the Darrelle Revis trade could be completed, as the cornerback had to pass a physical after missing 14 games with an ACL tear, but it reportedly went off without a hitch.

The dealing of the Pro Bowl cornerback marks a major shift for the Jets, who will received a first round pick (No. 13 overall) plus a conditional fourth round pick in the 2014 draft. Now with two high first-round draft picks, New York will be able to address major needs, getting two immediate impact players and accelerating what looked to be a rebuilding season.

But the Darrelle Revis also weakens the team’s overall defense at a time when the No. 2 spot in the AFC East is up for contention. With the Miami Dolphins appearing to be on the rise, it could be up to them and not the Jets to challenge the New England Patriots.

The 2013 NFL Draft will also be much different. With the two high draft picks, the Jets could be opened up to taking one of the top-rated wide receivers or quarterbacks. This could also shift the draft strategy of many other teams, especially those looking at quarterbacks.

For the Buccaneers, the Darrelle Revis trade marks a measure to improve the league’s worst pass defense, which allowed close to 300 yards per game last year. The Bucs had traded Aqib Talib to New England last season and this year lost E.J. Biggers to free agency.

The Darrelle Revis trade will now give Tampa more opportunities to let the rest of the defenders free, knowing that “Revis Island” will keep one side of the field locked down.

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