Posted in: Education

Strongsville Teachers Strike: Union Says Staff Not Overpaid

strongsville education association

Strongsville striking teachers took to the picket line for their fifth straight week on Monday. The Strongsville Education Association (SEA) represents nearly 400 educators in the district. The union claims that teacher salaries are not too high and are in line with similar schools in Cuyahoga County.

SEA President Tracy Linscott said, “The time has come to debunk the myth that Strongsville teachers are overpaid, when in fact truth may be just the opposite.” The Strongsville Board of Education maintains that the requested raises would put the district $2 million in the red.

Talks between the union and the school district reportedly broke down last Tuesday. There are currently no other known negotiation meetings scheduled. A total of 19 students have withdrawn from the district since the Strongsville strike began. Some parents frustrated with the ongoing strike opted to enroll their children in online charter schools or area private schools.

The Strongsville teacher starting salary typically ranges from $34,779 to $38,361. The average teacher salary in the district ranges from $66,558 to $73,746. The figures reportedly do not take into account the 10.3 percent retirement contribution the school district pays for each teacher. In Ohio, most teachers reportedly pay their own retirement contribution.

Union officials also pointed out that some Strongsville teachers are fourth-highest paid in the area. Strongsville school board members and strike opponents often dismiss the comparison rationale. Schools officials commented that how much other districts can afford to pay teachers is not the issue, it’s how much the Strongsville district and taxpayers can afford to pay.

An unnamed Strongsville substitute teacher talked with NewsNet5 about what it was like to enter the classroom during a labor dispute. The substitute teacher said she was angry that the Strongsville teachers said the classroom replacements were not qualified. The woman reportedly presented her certifications, noting advanced education in the field.

The Strongsville strike substitute teacher also stated that it was difficult to instruct the student’s without the lesson plan, books, or other necessary materials. It is common practice for teachers to leave the lesson plan book for substitutes so previous and planned activities can be reviewed. Many Ohio schools require teachers to turn their lesson plans in each week for review before the material is presented the following week.

What do you think of the Strongsville teachers strike?

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Comments

21 Responses to “Strongsville Teachers Strike: Union Says Staff Not Overpaid”

  1. Dave Archer

    Wouldn't there be an argument that since the teachers were paid to develop lesson plans as part of their employment that they should remain the property of the school? I mean, if you want to go stand in the cold instead of getting a paycheck then more power to ya…but to intentionally disrupt the education of our children is another thing.

  2. David Ploenzke

    NO! Lesson plans are created by the teacher to deliver the lesson they plan on delivering. As a teacher, all the outside research and development of lessons is not the property of the school. First of all this normally takes place in the evening and weekends. Second of all, if a teacher moves to a different district, they have the right to take their work with them.

    The subs can create their own lessons.

  3. Lisa Hagele Olsen

    They need to stop being so greedy and get back to work!!!! Pretty sad when your own community doesn't back you… come on people in those economy who can afford to go on strike

  4. JH Constance

    I Am Currently In Grad School And Dont Know If Ill Get A Job Right Out Of School. I Am Worried About The Students And Theor Ability To Graduate On Time.

  5. Trina Watt Perrine

    I agree with you Lisa! The community and surrounding communities are fed up with the unprofessional behavior that has been displayed by some of these teachers.

  6. Kristi Lynch

    SEA President Tracy Linscott is out to lunch and out of touch with reality, no tracy we no longer want public union members on defined benifit plans that guarantee them $5,000 to 9,000/month for the rest of their lives at expense of taxpayers. we want them on 40lk's like the private sector! 401k got that Tracy. ohio is over 66 billion in the red on public pension deficits that ohio taxpayers are going to have pay down the road such as a 3% additional tax imposed on ohio residents as done in california and Illinois…….so we need to change retirement to 401k's…. got it Tracy?

  7. Wendy Moore

    The average teacher's salary in avon lake (salary and benefits lower than Strongsville) according to the.
    school's website is $61,600. The school pays an additional.
    $17,083 for a family health insurance plan.
    and 14.5 percent of each salary for pension, which.
    in this case is $8,932 for a total average per teacher of $87,615/year!

    Since teachers work about 181 days a year, that figures out.
    to $484 per day. Teachers at the very top of the pay.
    scale can make a total of $110,151 a year or $608 a.
    day.

  8. Wendy Moore

    SEA President Tracy Linscott is out to lunch and out of touch with reality, no tracy we no longer want public union members on defined benifit plans that guarantee them $5,000 to 9,000/month for the rest of their lives at expense of taxpayers. we want them on 40lk's like the private sector! 401k got that Tracy. ohio is over 66 billion in the red on public pension deficits that ohio taxpayers are going to have pay down the road such as a 3% additional tax imposed on ohio residents as done in california and Illinois…….so we need to change retirement to 401k's…. got it Tracy?

  9. John Bova

    Jim, Jim, Jim…….those damn teachers are ruining everything. I can't afford to pay them more it would cut into my budget. How do you expect me to pay for my non-filter Pall Mall cigs and cable TV.

  10. Mark Capretta

    Does the stated salaries account for the three months off. When the salary is stated it really should be higher because they are getting paid for months they are not working. Hmmm -

  11. Valerie Horn Edmiston

    This is so old. Teachers do NOT get paid for the summer. Their salary is merely spread out over 12 months. And trust me, we all work over the summer.

  12. Mel Vandersluis

    My children's teachers are professional and qualified. We need highly qualified people. If we don't start paying more for them, our children won't get the education they need! These teachers ARE college graduates and many have doctorates!

  13. Mark Capretta

    Whatyou dont get is that if you dont work aprox 3months and you rget paid 60K( even if it is averaged out you are still getting a premium for the days that you do work so the math is something like this example 60 k a year = 5 k a month so you get 3 months when you are getting 5 k a month and not going to work so if you actually worked for 12 months a year ( I know an odd concept) you would get 15k added ( 3months *5k )onto your income. It means you would be getting 6.5k month while working that leads to an income 78 k a year not 60. Get it – you are paid at a rate of 78k a year if your salary is 60k . Its math

  14. Edward Kehm

    Most teachers are required to take credit classes to maintain their acreditation, or they can no longer teach. They must pay this out of their own pocket. My guess is that you are a "draw-bridge republican" who would be just as happy to see more poverty, and
    you would like to end public education.