Posted in: TV

‘Preachers’ Daughters': Yet Another Reality Show Is Invading The Airwaves

lifetime preachers daughters

Preacher’s Daughters reality show on Lifetime will supposedly focus on a multitude of teen rebellion topics. The series may be billed as a “docuseries” but appears to promise all the drama and angst associated with the typical reality show. Whether or not the world is ready for another reality show about illicit behavior by young woman, it will hit the airwaves on March 12.

Lifetime cameras will follow around three preachers’ daughters from prominent families. Such a scenario might sound boring, but surely the producers will not allow any unscripted mundane moments to actually make the final edit.

The reality show was a novel and intriguing idea when the first ones were created nearly a decade ago. But today unscripted series showcasing bad behavior now seem to dominate the viewing options on a majority of networks.

Watching Brandi Glanville talk about her vaginal rejuvenation surgery makes me yearn for a rerun of the Brady Bunch. The popular 70s series was about as based in reality as any of the Bravo Real Housewives shows are today.

I can recall rolling my eyes in silence when my grandmother talked about certain television shows fostering the moral decline of America, as it turns out – she was right as usual.

Preachers Daughters will likely exploit these young women, who will ultimately think of themselves as tv stars. Many of the faux celebrity reality show “stars” may be raking in the money now, but so many of them are considered nothing more than extremely botoxed, overly made-up punch lines to the viewing audience.

The new Preacher’s Daughters series will focus on how the girls struggle with coming of age when governed by parents with strict conduct expectations, Radar Online notes.

One of the Lifetime reality show cast members is a teen mom with a history of drug and alcohol use. The young woman’s alleged questionable parenting habits will also be a prominent part of the series.

When a team of cameramen follow around young women told to be good but are tempted to be bad, what could go wrong? Perhaps the public scrutiny will encourage the Preacher’s Daughters stars to stay on the straight and narrow path. Surely the new docuseries cast members won’t be encouraged to behave badly and rebel against their churches and their parents just to increase ratings.

In countless interviews, current and past reality show cast members tell reporters that they are nothing like their television personas. According to many such stars, they were merely fulfilling their “storyline” and following tips to generate ratings. The fleeting fame and likely the largest paycheck they have ever earned in their lives, is simply not worth a lifetime of ridicule and embarrassment.

The closest television came to a reality show when I was growing up was an after school special. The episodes based on true stories did not shy away from real teen issues and didn’t always have a happy ending, but never did they encourage reckless behavior or exploit individuals eager for their 15 minute of fame. The adults who sign on for reality shows have free will and by now know what to expect when the producer yells action, but what about the children who are tugged along for the ride?

Will you watch Preacher’s Daughters or do you feel reality shows have outlived their entertainment usefulness?

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