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Diane Lampert Dies: Legendary Songwriter For Hollywood Dead At 88

Diane Lampert Dies: Legendary Songwriter For Hollywood Dead At 88

Diane Lampert, an accomplished songwriter of the 1950s and 1960s and frequent contributor to the movies of her day, has died at age 88.

Lampert is remembered as an accomplished songwriter with a flair for the big screen, writing the title songs to more than 20 movies. She helped create music for movies starring many of the biggest stars of the day — Bob Hope, Cary Grant, and Buster Keaton among them.

Lampert also had a chance to work with the Beatles, though she didn’t officially get credit until decades later. She was a writer on one of the band’s songs, “Nothin Shakin’ (But The Leaves On The Trees),” but it wasn’t released until 1994 on “Live At The BBC.”

Success in the music world was part of the family for Lampert. Her husband of 45 years, Fred Stuart, was president of Rainbow Music Corp., The Associated Press pointed out.

Lampert was preceded in death this week by another Hollywood legend. Shadow Morton, a producer and songwriter, died in Febrary at age 71. Best known for original hit songs like “Leader of the Pack” and “Remember (Walking in the Sand),” Morton was remembered as a musical genius who played no instruments and couldn’t read music. Morton was said to have created all of his hit songs in his head.

Another legend of the musical film world died last year. Robert Sherman, who died in March, was famous for his work creating songs for Disney movies. Sherman created some of the most memorable show tunes and theme park songs, including “Chim Chim Cher-ee” and “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious” from Mary Poppins andIt’s a Small World (After All).”

Sherman died in his home in London at age 86.

Diane Lampert died of heart failure at a hospital in Manhattan, her husband said.

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One Response to “Diane Lampert Dies: Legendary Songwriter For Hollywood Dead At 88”

  1. Greg Young

    Actually," (Nothin' Shakin') But The Leaves on the Trees" was first a hit for Eddie Fontaine, in 1958, and it's true that The Beatles performed the song in their stage act in the very early years. The 1994 release "Live at the BBC" was a collection of Beatles' appearances on British radio, primarily during1963-64. It's highly doubtful that Ms. Lambert ever 'worked with' The Beatles through that chance connection.