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Steven Tyler To Testify At Legislative Hearing On Celebrity Privacy Bill

steven tyler

Steven Tyler is scheduled to testify during a legislative hearing on Friday in Hawaii about a bill that deals with the paparazzi and celebrity privacy.

The Steven Tyler Act, which was named after the Aerosmith singer, would ban photographers from taking pictures of celebrities and their families if there is a “reasonable expectation” of privacy.

The Associated Press reports that Tyler, who owns a multi-million dollar mansion in Hawaii, has already submitted a testimony. The musician plans to be present at the hearing tomorrow when legislators in Hawaii meet to discuss the bill for the first time.

The Steve Tyler Act was designed to protect celebrities like Tyler. Lawmakers in favor of the bill argue that celebrities are deterred from visiting and buying houses in Hawaii because there are so many paparazzi photographers.

The bill reads:

“Many celebrities are deterred from buying property or vacationing in Hawaii because the same paparazzi that harass them on the mainland are more likely to follow them to Hawaii.”

The Steve Tyler Act would make a “safe haven” for celebrities in Hawaii but some say that the bill could violate the first Amendment. Others argue that the bill is unenforceable and will likely ask Sen. Kalani English., to propose the bill, how the Steven Tyler act would classify a celebrity and what exactly determines a “reasonable expectations” for privacy.

A Hawaiian newspaper, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser, also wonders if the Steven Tyler Act will reach beyond professional photographers and target anyone with a camera phone.

What do you think of the Steven Tyler Act?

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Comments

9 Responses to “Steven Tyler To Testify At Legislative Hearing On Celebrity Privacy Bill”

  1. Craig Weidner

    About time.We need it in the U.S Too. Why do people think they have the right to bother these people just because They are rich and famous? Outlaw the paparazzi. They killed Diana and got away with it. It's a good law.

  2. Paul Moore

    @ John, put yourself in the shoes of a Hollywood celebrity. Constantly, and I do mean CONSTANTLY being chased around by some nut who will go to utmost extremes to pull the ultimate skeleton out of your closet because it could put $100k in his pocket. NOTHING is sacred to these guys!!

  3. Mike M Allen-Winter

    Who decides who a celebrity is? Where's our first amendment rights to take pictures in public? It was the laws benefitting the rich and punishing the poor that fueled the revolution. Why do we want to go back to that? They are people who choose to be in the spotlight. we already have laws on this matter: disorderly conduct, assault, harrassment, loitering, jay walking, etc… why do we need more?

  4. Vicki Garthwaite

    Geez, John – haven't you ever been so angry or upset that you have said or done something stupid and regretted it later.