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Seller Sued Over Home’s Bloody Past, Owner Shocked By Murder-Suicide

seller sued over home's bloody past

A seller is being sued over a home’s bloody past, and the new owner of the house alleges the previous owner and a real estate agent failed to disclose that a gruesome crime had been committed there just one year before it was purchased.

The owner learned of the home’s bloody past after purchasing the house and moving in — and 59-year-old Janet Milliken had hoped to begin life anew after a cross-country move. Milliken and her two teens moved from California to the Pennsylvania home after her husband passed away, but soon learned that the Thornton home had a grim history.

The seller managed to move the home with a bloody past for $610,000, and Milliken and her teenagers moved in and settled after its June 2007 purchase. But just weeks later, the home’s history was revealed to its new owner, and Milliken wants the sale reversed and her money refunded.

Yahoo explains the Thornton residence’s past and how it came to be in the frustrated owner’s possession:

“The matter dates back to Feb. 11. 2006, when a previous homeowner, Konstantinos Koumboulis, allegedly shot and killed his wife, then shot himself in the master bedroom … Joseph and Kathleen Jacono had bought the home Oct. 31, 2006, knowing of the murder-suicide, for $450,000. They later sold it to Milliken, who wants the transaction rescinded and her money back.”

While the home’s bloody past may seem less a worrisome matter than a fundamental flaw in the structure’s integrity, a lawyer for Milliken explains that the knowledge can be even more difficult to live with than a bad roof or chronic leak.

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Attorney Tim Rayne says:

“Having a gunshot murder-suicide committed within the home is much more devastating than having a small leak concealed by the previous homeowner … Physical defects can be fixed. Troubling events that could and did occur in this home could never go away.”

Rayne hopes that suing the seller over the home’s bloody past will “have Pennsylvania recognize that having a horrific event occur within a property can be just as damaging and troubling to a future homeowner as a physical defect, or perhaps even more so.”

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