Posted in: Technology

Google Making Kids Brain Dead: Inventor

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Google is making children “fairly brain dead” because they are losing to ability to make things with their hands.

That’s the opinion of Trevor Baylis, 75, who invented the wind-up radio and other devices.

According to London’s Daily Mail, Baylis believes kids are spending too much time on their computers and thereby becoming way too reliant on electronic devices. Instead, they should be playing with erector sets (known as Meccano sets in the UK) so that they are actually creating something tangible.

Baylis stated his views as follows:

“Children have got to be taught hands-on, and not to become mobile phone or computer dependent.

“They should use computers as and when, but there are so many people playing with their computers nowadays that spend all their time sitting there with a stomach.

“They are dependent on Google searches. A lot of kids will become fairly brain-dead if they become so dependent on the internet, because they will not be able to do things the old-fashioned way.”

Trevor Baylis

Baylis received the Order of the British Empire in 1997. He has developed many inventions for disabled persons. He also set up the Trevor Baylis Foundation to support invention and engineers.

According to the Daily Mail, “Mr. Baylis still has a workshop where he works on his inventions at his home in Twickenham, south-west London. He is currently lobbying the Government to do more to protect the intellectual property of inventors.”

Do you agree with Trevor Baylis that Google poses a danger of making young people brain dead?

[top image credit: Barabas]

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3 Responses to “Google Making Kids Brain Dead: Inventor”

  1. Douglas Clemens

    I agree with Mr. Baylis. Tools are wonderful but without a basic skill set children are lost. Mathematics and skills in the written word are necessity to creation. It is fabulous to have a calculator or word processing program but I am blessed by needing neither. My education gave me the skills to find solutions and appreciate tools. I fear for children who are no longer even taught to write but use a keyboard instead. I've been without electricity for a few days and still got my work done.