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Senators Request Commission To Look Into Shootings

gun control debate ensues

Two Senators today have asked for a commission to look over the details of mass shootings following the Newtown massacre. A third Senator wants to ban the sale of all military-style firearms, according to Yahoo News.

The whole country is in an uproar over the combined events across the United States this past week, including Westboro Baptist Church, gun control enthusiasts, and the Government itself. And for good reason.

Democrats have decided to turn to the voters, not the gun lobbyists, for ideas how to prevent future shootings.

Rep. Chris Murphy of Connecticut, who won a Senate seat in the November elections, says the time for talking is over. We need action.

The talk of gun control hasn’t risen this much since the 2008 elections, mostly due to the powerful sway of the National Rifle Association.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California says she has plans to build a national committee devoted to a ban on the sale of new assault weapons proposing legislation next year that would ban drums, big clips, and strips of more than 10 bullets.

On reviving the 10 year ban that Reuters says expired in 2004, she stated:

“It can be done.”

Senator Dick Durbin of Illinois says he would support this:

“This conversation has been dominated in Washington by — you know and I know — gun lobbies that have an agenda. We need people, just ordinary Americans, to come together, and speak out, and to sit down and calmly reflect on how far we go.”

Brian Malte, advocate of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, states:

“If you look at the states with the strongest gun laws in the country, they have some of the lowest gun death rates, and some of the states with the weakest gun laws have some of the highest gun death rates.”

Obviously there are strong opinions on both sides of the gun control fence. Until the violence dies down, the debate will remain heated.

The Senate is attempting to find solutions.

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