Posted in: Weather

Minnesota Blizzard Blamed In 600 Crashes

Minnesota Blizzard Responsible For At Least 600 Crashes

A massive Minnesota blizzard is to blame for 600 crashes as the slow-moving storm dumped over a foot of snow in parts of the Upper Midwest.

Minneapolis was subject to at least 16 inches of snow on Sunday — the city’s biggest snowfall since two years ago when snow caused the Metrodome roof to collapse, reports Fox News.

Blizzard conditions, along with blowing and drifting snow, were largely responsible for the more than 600 crashes because of low visibility. The state’s Department of Transportation was even forced to pull several snowplows off of highways in southwest and west Minnesota on Sunday afternoon.

There were at least 1,140 spinouts and 600 crashes reported by the Minnesota State Patrol, according to Lieutenant Eric Roeske, who added that driving conditions in the Midwest state remain hazardous. One person died in a crash, while injuries were reported in 63 other accidents.

The New York Daily News notes that crashes were not limited to Minnesota. Wisconsin also reported several accidents related to the massive blizzard, including a jacknifed semi that caused a closure of a westbound lane on Interstate 94. The storm was also responsible for interstate closures in nearby South Dakota.

The blizzard in Minnesota is a huge start to the winter season for the Midwest state, whose biggest storm last season only garnered four inches of snow. A few school districts in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and South Dakota either canceled or delayed classes on Monday morning.

Along with being blamed for more than 600 crashes in Minnesota, the massive blizzard was also responsible for about 150 flights at Minneapolis-St. Paul Airport being canceled.

Articles And Offers From The Web

Comments

4 Responses to “Minnesota Blizzard Blamed In 600 Crashes”

  1. David Schulz

    We were on the interstate Sunday from West Bend, Wi to the Twin Cities. Wisconsin roads were much better than Minnesota's due to the fact that their crews were out in force an taking care of the conditions, unlike MN's looked like they were waiting until it was over to go out.