stephen king's it remake sex scenes original miniseries book novel

These Scenes May Be Too Far Over The Line To Be Included In The Remake Of Stephen King’s ‘It’

Stephen King’s It is one of the most frightening tales to ever scare the world and knowing that it will be remade into an R-rated flick only means more terror and fear. If you’ve read King’s book, you know just how terrifying your imagination can be when turning his words into your thoughts, but the miniseries from the ’90s gave them something real to see. Now, the remake is going to be even more intense, but there are some scenes which will likely never make it to the big screen.

Please note that the following information will contain spoilers for the novel and movie versions of Stephen King’s It. If you have not read the book or don’t want to know what may happen in the remake, stop reading now.

Those that have not read the book may not realize exactly how in-depth the story of It actually is, but they get the gist of it. Everyone has learned from the original miniseries and the trailer for the remake that it features a freakish clown named Pennywise, who torments and kills children.

While that is pretty much what happens, there is more to the story than that, and it goes deep into the psyche of not only those in the story but those learning of it. That is why everyone should read the book when they get the chance because the following scenes will likely never make it into any film adaptation of Stephen King’s It.

stephen king's it remake sex scenes original miniseries book novel
[Image by Warner Bros.]

It isn’t totally unexpected for those who have read the book, but Movie Pilot pointed out one scene that will probably never make it into It. Just thinking about it, they are quite possibly 100 percent right.

The Losers Club have a strange sex circle in the sewers under Derry

Near the end of the story, the kids have just defeated and supposedly killed Pennywise the Clown, but they are lost in the tunnels of the sewer. The six boys find themselves losing all hope, and they want to just lay down and give up because they fear they’ll never make it out alive.

That’s when Beverly Marsh, the club’s only female member, comes up with a plan. It is not the most socially acceptable idea that drags up from her memories of her father molesting her, but Beverly insists that all of the boys have sex with her, one at a time, in the sewer.

A few years ago, StephenKing.com asked the author about why the sex scene was included in the book, and King admitted that it made more sense then than now.

“I wasn’t really thinking of the sexual aspect of it. The book dealt with childhood and adulthood –1958 and Grown Ups. The grown ups don’t remember their childhood. None of us remember what we did as children–we think we do, but we don’t remember it as it really happened. Intuitively, the Losers knew they had to be together again. The sexual act connected childhood and adulthood. It’s another version of the glass tunnel that connects the children’s library and the adult library. Times have changed since I wrote that scene and there is now more sensitivity to those issues.”

It is really strange, but it fits into the story when reading it. For those that haven’t read the book and go see the movie, though, they won’t understand it. Most people will also probably think it is way too much, and Movie Pilot believes Muschietti realizes that “mainstream audiences” won’t accept a kids’ orgy.

The majority of everything that happens at The Black Spot

The Black Spot is one of the most significant locations in It as it is a huge historical incident from Derry’s past, and it has so much to do with Mike Hanlon. The fire that took place in that club is one that is not only hard to read or watch, but it could cause a lot of racial tension with movie-goers.

Yes, the book explains why it happened and has the reasoning in great detail, but it may be hard to fully express all of that within the time allowed in the movie. Still, this is a serious moment that needs to be addressed, and the trailer for It does show a drawing of The Black Spot on a wall, but how much more will we get?

The Leper on Niebolt Street and his conversations with Eddie

There was pretty much nothing about the house on Niebolt Street in the original miniseries, but it plays such a big part in Stephen King’s novel of “It.” The leper is one of the forms that Pennywise the Clown took, and while he tormented all of the kids, Eddie was his main target.

At one point, there was even the fact that the leper offered to teach the art of oral sex for cash, and it gets pretty detailed. That little interaction will probably be left out entirely since they were already able to get an R-rating and certainly don’t want a more restrictive rating.

Last year, Dark Horizons stumbled across some videos that appeared to show Eddie confronted and chased by the leper on Niebolt Street, but how much will be brought over from the book?

A few other scenes that may end up being too extreme for the remake of Stephen King’s It.

  • Eddie Corcoran’s death
  • Some of Beverly’s sexual interactions with her father
  • Henry and Patrick having a homosexual encounter in the yard at school
  • Henry Bowers carving an “H” into Ben’s stomach
  • The Patrick Hockstetter fridge moment
stephen king's it remake sex scenes original miniseries book novel
[Image by Warner Bros.]

This fall, Stephen King’s It will have a brand new adaptation, which will officially hit theaters and scare everyone beginning on Sept. 8. The more the summer rolls on, the greater your fear of Pennywise the Clown will grow.

There is very little doubt that director Andres Muschietti is going to bring forth a rather stellar R-rated version of Stephen King’s It, but it likely won’t be fully complete. That isn’t overly surprising or even disappointing as most film adaptations of novels don’t include all the moments or even every really important detail. Scenes such as the intimate one between The Losers Club or the others mentioned above simply would never allow the remake to make it to the screen.

[Featured Image by Warner Bros.]

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