Lisa Vanderpump Cheers For Yulin Festival Dog Meat Ban, “We Have Been Heard”
lisa vanderpump cheers on twitter for ban on yulin dog meat sales

Lisa Vanderpump Cheers For Yulin Festival Dog Meat Ban, “We Have Been Heard”

Lisa Vanderpump cheers “Yippeeeeeeee” on Twitter as news breaks that China will ban the sale of dog meat at the infamously inhumane Yulin festival. The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star has personally taken action towards stopping the horrific event.

Lisa celebrates the victory on Twitter.

The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star Lisa Vanderpump cheered on Twitter just before the news broke that the Chinese government would be banning the sale of dog meat and enforcing strict fines at the Yulin festival.

The reality star and restaurant owner has personally taken an interest in stopping the animal torture that occurs at the Lychee and Dog Meat Festival. Lisa has even opened her own store, Vanderpump Pets, inspired by her love for animals.

“Yippeeeeeeee

Yippeeeeeeeeeeeee

Yippeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

We have been heard! News coming soon.”

Lisa Vanderpump and her husband Ken Todd started stopyulinforever.org with their partner, John Sessa, to launch petitions and hold rallies to fight to end the Yulin festival.

Vanderpump and the rest of the ladies were seen on this season of The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills traveling to China to work on a documentary to stop the Yulin festival.

Each year, more than 10 million dogs are killed for meat to be sold at Yulin’s Dongkou market. Most of the dogs that are slaughtered are stolen family pets and strays picked off the street.

Dog meat will be banned at the annual Chinese festival after activists have fought for years to put an end to the animal torture, Daily Mail reported. Tragically, millions of cats will still be killed for their meat during the festival, which has not banned cat meat.

Ban on dog meat to be set June 15.

The ban on dog meat will be effective as of June 15, and violators will face fines of 100,000 yuan and risk of arrest. Authorities have also introduced roadblocks to help regulate the flow of animals into the city.

Animal campaigners Duo Duo Animal Welfare Project and Humane Societ International first received reports that the ban was going to be set from Chinese activists. The ban was later confirmed by three traders at the market.

Despite the fact that people typically think that the Yulin festival is an old tradition, the event started in 2010 by dog meat traders in order to boost flagging sales.

Most people in China don’t even eat dogs. Pet owners have gotten into violent altercations with dog thieves coming for their pets.

The ban is temporary.

Although the ban is a big step in the right direction towards ending the Yulin festival, activists still realize that the ban is temporary, and there is still more work that needs to be done to stop the animal cruelty at the festival altogether and permanently.

Andrea Gung of the Duo Duo Animal Welfare Project commented to reporters that “even if this is a temporary ban, we hope this will have a domino effect, leading to the collapse of the dog meat trade market.”

“I have visited Yulin many times in the last two years. This ban is consistent with my experience that Yulin and the rest of the country are changing for the better.

I am very impressed that the younger generation in Yulin and in China is as compassionate as their counterparts in the rest of world.”

Peter Li, a China Policy specialist at Humane Society International, said that “the Yulin dog meat festival is not over just yet, but if this news is true as we hope, it is a really big nail in the coffin for a gruesome event that has come to symbolize China’s crime-fuelled dog meat trade.”

[Featured Image by Rob Kim / Stringer / Getty Images]

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