nathan ulrich

Plane Missing Over Bermuda Triangle: Pilot Nathan Ulrich, NYC CEO Jennifer Blumin, And Her Two Sons Missing

A small private plane has gone missing over the Bermuda Triangle. The twin-engine MU-2B plane was only 37 miles east of the island of Eleuthera when it lost radio contact on Monday.

The plane missing over the Bermuda Triangle was carrying four people, including two children. Nathan Ulrich was piloting the small plane. He is a mechanical engineer and the founder of Xootr, a company that manufactures folding bicycles and kick scooters.

Jennifer Blumin, the CEO and founder of Skylight Group, a New York City event management company, was flying in the plane alongside her two children. Blumin’s sons are 4 and 10.

The MU-2B twin-engine plane was flying at an altitude of about 24,000 feet and traveling at a speed of 300 knots when it lost radar and radio contact with air traffic controllers in Miami.

Nathan Ulrich and his three passengers were flying from Borinquen, Puerto Rico, to Titusville, a town along the northeastern coast of Florida. The long-overdue plane took off from Puerto Rico around 11 a.m. yesterday. Ulrich is reportedly a former member of the United States Coast Guard.

“There’s no indication of significant adverse weather at the time,” said U.S. Coast Guard Lieutenant Commander Ryan Kelly.

U.S. Coast guard planes are searching the Bermuda Triangle area for the missing plane and the four souls on board. The United States Border Patrol and the Royal Bahamas Defense Force are aiding in the search and rescue mission, the Daily Mail reports.

A cutter from the U.S. Coast Guard fleet was sent to the search area and is expected to arrive and join in the rescue efforts later today.

Jennifer Blumin founded the Skylight group in 2004. Her event management company specializes in “re-conceiving” historical spaces and converting them for use as venues for upscale events. The group’s portfolio also includes Skylight West, Skylight at Moynihan Station, and Skylight One Hanson in Brooklyn. Blumin’s company also has a private events partnership on the High Line.

In 2016, hexagonal clouds churning up massively terrifying “air bombs” were reported in the Bermuda Triangle, with winds reaching 170 miles per hour and measuring 45 feet high. Many scientists believed the mystery surrounding why so many ships and planes perished in the water and the skies above the area had finally been solved.

“They are formed by what are called microbursts and they’re blasts of air that come down out of the bottom of a cloud and then hit the ocean and then create waves that can sometimes be massive in size as they start to interact with each other,” meteorologist Randy Cerveny said during an interview with the Mirror. “These types of hexagonal shapes over the ocean are in essence air bombs.”

The Bermuda Triangle encompasses about 500,000 kilometers in the North Atlantic Ocean. At least 75 airplanes and hundreds of ships are known to have gone down in the mysterious region of the ocean. At least 1,000 lives have been lost due to sinking or crashes in the Bermuda Triangle, also known as the “Devil’s Triangle,” over the past century. Approximately 20 ship and four airplanes go missing in the area each year.

Both boats and planes have completely vanished in good weather for hundreds of years in the Bermuda Triangle. One of the most mysterious and famous disappearances of planes involved a squadron of United States Navy bombers, the Sun reports. The planes became completely disoriented when flying over the Devil’s Triangle; they were never found.

A multitude of other boats and planes simply vanished as well when traversing the area, without so much as a single distress single being sent out. In the spring of 1918, the USS Cyclops sank somewhere between Chesapeake Bay and Barbados. The 542-foot-long Navy cargo ship was carrying 300 men when it disappeared without an SOS call being emitted. An extensive rescue and recovery mission for the USS Cyclops yielded not even a single piece wreckage.

[Featured Image by WindVector/Shutterstock]

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