Ryan Gosling Was A Toddler When The First ‘Blade Runner’ Was Released, Now He’s The Key To The Sequel
Ryan Gosling Blade Runner Harrison Ford sequel 2049

Ryan Gosling Was A Toddler When The First ‘Blade Runner’ Was Released, Now He’s The Key To The Sequel

When the original Blade Runner was released in 1982, it showed the main star Harrison Ford shooting replicants and making out with hot ladies on the set. Ryan Gosling, meanwhile, was just a toddler.

More than 35 years later, the tables have turned. And Ryan Gosling is now the key to the sequel of Blade Runner – he interacts with naked women and puts his gun to work (as seen from the official trailer released on Monday).

Harrison Ford, who turns 75-years-old this summer, meanwhile, clears the way for the younger generation – Ryan Gosling – to hunt down machines 30-years after the events of the original 1982 Blade Runner.

Not that Harrison Ford is complaining about getting his hands on yet another retro franchise after reprising his roles in the new Indiana Jones and Star Wars films.

The new official trailer for Blade Runner, which hits theaters this October, bombarded its way straight to the #1 Trending on YouTube position within hours, and rightfully so. The trailer has it all: the darkly beautiful visual style, Jared Leto, a dystopian world swarming with artificial intelligence machines, and a haunting vision of what the year of 2049 may look like.

The original 1982 Blade Runner starring Harrison Ford was set in the year of 2019, and it offered a pretty prophetic vision of the future. Though, unfortunately, there have been no flying cars yet, director Ridley Scott was right when he anticipated advances in artificial intelligence.

Or is the world yet to see flying machines within the next two years?

Blade Runner 2049‘s Director Denis Villeneuve (Arrival), Harrison Ford, and Ryan Gosling took part in an exclusive Q&A in Los Angeles ahead of the trailer’s release, and the new main star of the sci-fi film called the absence of flying cars in 2017 “disappointing,” though he did admit that he’s being careful with his electronics just to be on the safe side, according to the Los Angeles Times.

“But I’m being nicer to my electronics just in case.”

Even though Ryan Gosling was a toddler when the original Blade Runner hit theaters in 1982, the pop culture he grew up in was deeply influenced by the hit sci-fi film starring Harrison Ford.

The new Blade Runner film depicts a story about a young LAPD blade runner named Officer K (Ryan Gosling) who goes on a mission to find Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), the hero of the original film who has been missing for 30-years since the events of the first film.

Interestingly, by the time the new Blade Runner hits theaters, Ryan Gosling will be nearly the same age Harrison Ford was when he was cast in the 1982 film.

The sequel’s director, Villeneuve, has done a rather impressive job at re-creating the atmosphere and the dark visual template of the first film. Just like its predecessor, the new Blade Runner film will explore both the bad and the good side of technological advances, namely in the artificial intelligence department.

While the main subject of the sequel is as relevant in 2017 as it was in 1982 – if not more – the director teased that the sequel will show a society that has “lost its memory and its relationship with history in some ways.”

“That’s something that’s frightening and relevant with our world today.”

Harrison Ford also pointed out during the Q&A session that the new Blade Runner film tackles some of the “ethical considerations” technology has to offer to the modern world, adding that Blade Runner 2049 will explore both “the benefit of technology and the social consequences of it.”

What are your thoughts on the Blade Runner sequel? Have your say in the comments below.

[Featured Image by Eric Charbonneau/AP Images]

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