April The Giraffe Baby Sticking Out

April The Giraffe’s Baby’s Appendage ‘Sticking Out’ – Gender Delivery System Woes Persist

April the giraffe’s belly is bulging and the baby is sticking out, this is the buzz on the pending arrival of the baby giraffe today. The excitement is on the upswing as something is protruding from April the giraffe’s left side that appears to be one of the baby’s appendages. Sunday morning’s update is detailed right down to April the giraffe defecating a piece of manure that is different in size.

Us Weekly reports that April’s baby is sticking out from the side of her bulging stomach. While this has been seen before, today it is more defined. While it has been said before that the time is near, it is really looking that way today.

With her manure change and the team tending to April noticing her front teats filling up further than before, the anticipation is bubbling up more than ever. According to My Fox News 8, the team attending to April, while she is moving closer to giving birth, are monitoring all types of things during this process.

Since February 23, people slowly started to tune into a live feed set up for all to see April the giraffe plod along in her pregnancy. Then something rather bizarre happened, this became a “must-see” destination for the masses as people from across the globe started to watch April the giraffe. The Animal Adventure Park in Upstate New York has become one very recognizable name because of their live-streaming of this giraffe’s pregnancy.

Giraffes carry their baby for 15 months before giving birth and when their term is done, they give birth to one big baby. April’s calf is expected to weigh 150 pounds and stand 6-feet tall at birth, which is the average weight and height for a newborn giraffe calf. April’s baby’s name will be decided by a contest that will start after the giraffe baby makes its way into the world.

The Animal Adventure Park Giraffe cam has been going full-steam ahead since the end of February, with a couple of incidents of downtime. Animal activists had it taken down at one point claiming some of the things seen were too graphic and they were against giraffes in captivity.

The post was allowed back up and it is one educational destination today for toddlers to senior citizens. Then, the natural glitches of today’s Internet came into play rendering the feed in a blackout state a few times, but it is up and running with all eyes on April the giraffe today.

While the world waits for April’s baby giraffe, a zoo in England just had a birth of a baby giraffe. The video below will give you an idea of what to expect from April and her baby any day now. As you can see in the below Facebook post, this baby giraffe is wobbly, which is totally expected when he or she first comes into this world. It didn’t take long for this giraffe to take his first “adorable steps,” as the video below displays.

This has been a great family activity of watching April get ready to give birth and then when the time comes, being able to watch the birth live. But a recent change has some viewers up in arms. This live-feed of April is free to watch and some of the fans of this giraffe have been there since day one observing April on their electronic device. The veterinarians tending to April have taken an ultrasound of the unborn calf, but because of the way the baby is positioned, the gender is unknown.

According to New York Upstate News, an app, which will cost you $4.99, will allow you to know the gender of April’s baby before the world does. Needless to say, this charge has people livid, especially those who have been there since the beginning. According to a previous article from the Inquisitr, this has people up in arms. It is the Animal Adventure Park who initiated this app alert system and the funds collected will go to the Giraffe Conservation Foundation Fund. Despite the money going to a good cause, it hasn’t subsided much of the angst of being charged to know the baby’s gender at the time of the calf’s birth.

[Featured Image by Julio Cortez/AP Images]

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