Physicists at the Large Hadron Collider have just discovered five new subatomic particles.

Smashing Discovery: The Large Hadron Collider Detects Five New Particles

The Large Hadron Collider has just detected five new subatomic articles all at once, and these particles are very special as we can now learn how the center of atoms are stuck together because of them by something called the “strong force,” which is almost like glue that binds atoms on the inside. The new subatomic particles just discovered are a variation of the Omega-c baryon, which was found in 1994.

The Independent reports that the five new particles were discovered at the Large Hadron Collider while researchers were working on something known as “the beauty experiment, or the LGCb experiment. This experiment aims at discovering what conditions were like in the universe right after the Big Bang occurred.

Physicists have long since suspected that these other types of Omega-c baryon subatomic particles existed, but they have not been able to prove their existence up until this time. CERN has called the latest discovery of the Large Hadron Collider as “a hotbed of new and outstanding physics results.”

Dr. Greig Cowan, from the University of Edinburgh, has lauded the work of the Large Hadron Collider as the new discovery of these five subatomic particles will yield information on the binding of quarks, not to mention help physicists to better understand the workings of pentaquarks and tetraquarks, as the BBC reports.

“This is a striking discovery that will shed light on how quarks bind together. It may have implications not only to better understand protons and neutrons, but also more exotic multi-quark states, such as pentaquarks and tetraquarks.”

Professor Tara Shears from Liverpool University explains that these five subatomic particles have been right in front of us the whole time, but it was only with the help of the Large Hadron Collider that physicists have finally been able to prove their incontrovertible existence.

“These particles have been hiding in plain sight for years, but it has taken the exquisite sensitivity of the LHCb to bring them to our attention.”

A photograph of the CMS detector of the Large Hadron Collider at the World Machine Exhibition in Berlin on October 14, 2008.
A photograph of the CMS detector of the Large Hadron Collider at the World Machine Exhibition in Berlin on October 14, 2008. [Image by Sean Gallup/Getty Images]

What is particularly remarkable about the latest discovery at the Large Hadron Collider is the fact that five particles were all discovered in just one analysis, as Science Alert report. For physicists to discover a new state is already impressive, but to discover five new states all in one go is nearly miraculous.

The five new particles that the Large Hadron Collider detected were excited states of Omega-c-zero, which is a subatomic particle which contains three quarks. The particle states as listed are Ωc(3000)0, Ωc(3050)0, Ωc(3066)0, Ωc(3090)0, and Ωc(3119)0. The next step for physicists will be to find out the quantum numbers of these five new subatomic particles and then learn more about their theoretical significance.

Once physicists have studied these five new particles further, they will be able to better understand the relationship between quarks and multi-quark states, which will add valuable new knowledge to the field of quantum theory.

The Globe of Science and Innovation at CERN, where the Large Hadron Collider resides.
The Globe of Science and Innovation at CERN, where the Large Hadron Collider resides. [Image by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images]

At the moment, there are around 10,000 engineers and physicists that are working with the Large Hadron Collider. Thanks to the LHC, the Higgs boson was found and physicists have been able to find subatomic particles like the five new ones just detected. Other discoveries relating to the paranormal have also been solved as Professor Brian Cox has said that the Large Hadron Collider now absolutely disproves the existence of ghosts, as the Inquisitr reported.

In the future, the Large Hadron Collider will enable physicists to more fully understand subjects like parallel dimensions, dark matter and what the universe was like immediately after the Big Bang. This has been referred to as the “dark sector of physics.”

Now that the Large Hadron Collider has detected these five new subatomic particles, what do you think physicists will discover next?

[Featured Image by Johannes Simon/Getty Images]

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