Goofing off helps your mental batteries recharge between arduous tasks.

National Goof-Off Day Encourages Slacking Off On March 22

Believe it or not, National Goof Off Day is a real thing. It’s a day that celebrates the procrastinator and your inner child who wants to just kick back, watch Netflix, and chill out. National Goof Off Day is a day to take a vacation, read that book you’ve been putting on the back burner, or maybe just hit the snooze button and sleep in.

Remember to have fun with your friends and family on National Goof Off Day
Goofing off doesn’t mean just laying around doing nothing. [Image by POJ THEVEENUGUL/Shutterstock]

Goof Off Day History

National Goof Off Day was created by William D. Chase, the gentleman who created Chase’s Calendar of Events, an annual publication that has been in print since 1957. He created National Goof Off Day with his granddaughter Monica Dufour in 1976, and it has been included in the publication ever since. According to Holiday Insights, she pitched the idea to her grandfather when she was 10.

“When I was 10, (1976) I was listening to him speaking on a radio station encouraging people to call with ideas. I disguised my voice and called with Goof-Off Day (since I was goofing off by calling in). He said there wasn’t such a day, but he thought it was a great idea. The next day, I confessed to him I called in about Goof-Off Day. He smiled, and showed me a local newspaper that said there was a need for a Goof-Off Day. I guess the reporter got wind of the interview. Anyway, that is how the holiday began….”

William Chase, who would have turned 95 on April 2 of 2017, watched his modest publication grow from a 32-page edition with 364 entries to a 752-page behemoth with over 12,500 holidays, birthdays, and sporting events around the world.

How To Celebrate National Goof Off Day

Although Goof Off Day isn’t a federally recognized holiday, that doesn’t mean you still can’t have fun with it. While it may not be feasible to call in sick to work just to spend the day goofing off, there are other ways for you to celebrate.

Among the time honored traditions of goofing off at work without getting caught is the “boss button.” March Madness is in full swing now, and while there aren’t any games being streamed today, you should still know about this magic trick. Every year, CBS streams all of the games, even the ones that occur during working hours. Of course, most companies don’t believe that watching hoops is an effective use of company time. In light of that, CBS created the “boss button” that allows you to turn your browser into something that looks more work related.

And don’t forget that according to studies have shown that goofing off can actually help your productivity. According to some studies, when you focus on one task for a long period of time, that’s equal to flexing one muscle for an extended period. Just like physical muscles, your brain needs an occasional break between tasks. So while you might not be able to watch a hoops game or take the day off, there are some small goof offs that will help you refocus and get back to work.

A short walk around the block can help by getting you fresh air and a change of scenery. This especially helps if you’ve come to an impasse or roadblock in your job. Taking your conscious mind off of the problem can help your subconscious work on it, leading to that ever useful burst of intuition that will help you solve whatever is troubling you.

National Goof off Day is celebrated every March 22
A 15-minute nap is a great way to recharge and goof off at the same time. [Image by Stokkete/Shutterstock]

Of course, if your job offers it as a perk, a 15-minute nap can really recharge your batteries. Closing your eyes when you’re feeling stressed can help you return to the task at hand refreshed and ready to tackle it with a new perspective.

However you choose to celebrate it, National Goof-Off Day only comes around once a year. Enjoy your friends and family and their company and goof off a little, if only to remind yourself why you work so hard the other 364 days of the year.

[Featured Image by Bikeriderlondon/Shutterstock]

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