Amazon Prime News: 2-Hour Beer & Wine Delivery In Cincinnati & Columbus
Scarlett Moffatt of Gogglebox visits the Amazon Newcastle Distribution center.

Amazon Prime News: 2-Hour Beer & Wine Delivery In Cincinnati & Columbus

The latest Amazon Prime news will make Amazon Prime Now users who drink alcoholic beverages in Columbus and Cincinnati and don’t like leaving the house very happy.

Per a brief released by Reuters, Amazon.com Inc. has announced an expansion to add both wine and beer to the products offered through their one- and two-hour Prime Now delivery. Currently, this expansion is being offered as part of their Prime Now delivery program in Columbus and Cincinnati. It was today (Wednesday, March 15) that Amazon.com Inc. launched this expansion in their Prime Now delivery problem in these two cities.

Olly Murs visits Amazon to pick, pack and personally deliver surprise gifts to a family of fans using Amazon Prime Now one-hour service
Amazon Prime Now delivery service [Image by Eamonn M. McCormack/Getty Images for Amazon]

This latest Amazon Prime news shouldn’t come as too much of a shock, as Columbus Business First notes Amazon.com Inc. started laying down the groundwork necessary to add alcoholic beverages to the list of products delivered through Prime Now in Cincinnati and Columbus back last year. It was in October of last year that Columbus Business First reported Amazon Inc. – through Prime Now LLC – had filed for the necessary permits to sell pre-packaged low-proof mixed drinks, wine, and carryout beer in these two cities. The permits were filed to give Amazon.com Inc. permission to carry and sell alcoholic beverages through their Prime Now service in Franklin and Hamilton counties, where the company currently offered both one- and two-hour delivery.

September 15 of last year was listed as the official date Amazon.com Inc. filed for the permits. Columbus Business First noted it could take anywhere from 10 to 12 weeks for the permit to be processed and a decision to be made regarding whether or not the permit would be approved.

It was in May of last year that Prime Now was introduced to Columbus with two-hour delivery of consumer goods and groceries for members with a Prime subscription. At the same time, Amazon.com Inc. also started to offer one-hour delivery – for a fee – to Prime members in Seattle. In Seattle, a number of alcohol products were a part of the delivery service from the time it started. It was not until December, however, that alcoholic products started to roll out in other cities as well.

Amazon.com Inc. is following in the footsteps of Columbus startup Refill which Columbus-based Alcohol Deliveries LLC produced. The Columbus startup Refill has operated as the fastest growing app for local liquor stores who sell spirits, wine, beer, and snacks. Notably, there was also an app called Drizly.com launched in Boston which also provided locals with the option of having a variety of alcohol-based products delivered to them.

As those who follow the latest Amazon Prime Now news know, members can purchase the yearly Amazon Prime membership for $99. By having the Prime membership, you also get access to the Amazon Prime Now – which is an app you can download to any smartphone or tablet. Through Amazon Prime Now, members can get free two-hour delivery or one-hour delivery with a fee. Per Columbus Business First, Amazon.com Inc. offers more than just groceries and traditional household products such as soaps and cleaning supplies via Amazon Prime. Even items such as a television and other electronics can be purchased through the Prime Now delivery service. Exactly what can be ordered through the Prime Now delivery service tends to vary based on what is currently in inventory at the warehouse.

Man ordering alcohol to be delivered to his home via app on his tablet.
Alcohol delivery app [Image by Andrei Kuzmik/ShutterStock]

The biggest question consumers have about this latest Amazon Prime news is whether or not buying alcoholic beverages through the delivery service is worthwhile. Per Columbus Business First, a quick scan of the products on the app shows prices that are comparable to what a consumer would pay if purchasing directly from the grocery store.

What are your thoughts on being able to have alcoholic beverages delivered to you using Amazon Prime Now?

[Featured Image by Andrew Benge/Getty Images for Amazon]

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