The next iPhone could have facial recognition

iPhone 8 May Have 3D Facial Recognition Like Microsoft Windows 10 Devices?

Apple may be forgoing Touch ID technology in favor of 3D facial recognition. Mac Rumors has the news.

“Apple’s widely expected 5.8-inch iPhone with an edge-to-edge OLED display will feature a front-facing 3D laser scanner for facial recognition, corroborating previous rumors, according to JPMorgan analyst Rod Hall.”

The article adds that Hall claims the scanner will replace Touch ID as Apple plans to remove the Home button to allow for an edge-to-edge display. Some of the commenters after the article aren’t very thrilled.

“Touch-ID is too convenient to go away. If anything, facial recognition should complement it, not replace it,” says Andres Cantu.

The iPhone may have facial recognition
Some people aren’t thrilled about Apple’s plans for facial recognition. [Image by Bryan Thomas/Getty Images]

“So what’s gonna happen to Apple Pay? Can imagine people taking ‘selfies’ at in order to pay their purchases,” says Lotsofphone.

If Apple employs this type of technology, it will be similar to Windows Hello on Windows 10 devices that allows you to log in by facial recognition. However, Windows Hello hasn’t been without its problems. Some people claim it drains battery life, and at times, doesn’t recognize faces accurately. Given that Apple has been able to perfect technology started by other companies, it will be interesting to see if Apple can make facial recognition security features mainstream.

Besides the facial recognition features and edge-to-edge display, the iPhone 8 is likely to come in two different versions: a 4.7-inch device and a 5.8-inch one as well. The website 9to5 Mac also claims we will see an all-glass design with a variety of colors and a Home button that is actually embedded inside the screen. According to Mac Rumors, inductive wireless charging could also come to Apple’s next smartphone.

Over the course of the last year, there has been ongoing speculation that wireless charging company Energous has inked a deal with Apple and could potentially provide wireless charging technology for the upcoming iPhone 8,” says Mac Rumors columnist Juli Clover, who adds that a new investor’s note from Copperfield Research outlines why Apple has no plans to use Energous’ WattUp radio frequency-based wireless charging solution.

According to BGR, the next iPhone launch will be even bigger than expected.

“By all accounts, this year’s iPhone launch will be a big deal. Unlike the last few years, which have seen mostly-incremental improvements, Apple is expected to blow the doors off with the 10th anniversary iPhone.”

The article adds that a research firm suggests that Apple will ramp up production in June, which is two months earlier than it usually does. The iPhone 8 could be the biggest iPhone launch in history. It’s obvious that Apple is planning on big things since it will be the 10th anniversary of the first iPhone release.

The very first iPhone was released on June 29, 2007. There were lines of people all over camping out for the phone, which went on sale later in the day. Like all first generation units, the iPhone had its drawbacks. For one thing, the App store would debut one year later with the iPhone 3G. Speaking of 3G, the first iPhone only had speeds comparable to faster dial-up devices, which was still slow for 2007. And the first iPhone was only available on AT&T’s network — something that would change in 2011.

The Palm Pre arrived on Sprint's network
The 2009 Palm Pre was just one of the iPhone clones that failed. [Image by Jae C. Hong/AP Images]

Within a couple of years, there were many so-called “iPhone killers” that were released. One was the Palm Pre, released on Sprint in June of 2009, that became one of the biggest smartphone failures in history. Another was the Blackberry Storm, another major failure that was unleashed at the end of 2008.

Are you planning on getting the iPhone 8? Let us know your thoughts in comments section.

[Featured Image by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images]

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