Women's March: President Trump Is Only One Reason Women Chose To Band Together Worldwide

Women’s March: President Trump Is Only One Reason Women Chose To Band Together Worldwide

On Saturday, January 21, 2017, millions of women gathered across the United States to protest against President Donald Trump’s inauguration. In an overwhelming display of support for the women of the United States, women from across the globe did the same in their home countries. Also, many men joined the march to show their support as well.

The Women’s March was intended to take place in Washington D.C. around the National Mall and the White House. However, many women across the United States that could not attend the march chose to join rallies in their local areas. It is estimated that nearly 200,000 women marched in Washington D.C., and between 3.6 and 4.5 million across the entire country. Worldwide estimates are not known.

Each of the women joined in a common theme of fighting against discrimination and hatred against women, as well as misogyny. However, it was quickly evident that many of the women that joined in on the nationwide women’s marches had their own personal reasons as well.

Metro highlighted a selection of the women that marched against President Donald Trump, asking why they were present at the march and what they expected to achieve by being there. The responses were very personal and inspiring.

Each of the women were identified only by their first name, with a quote displayed, revealing their reasons for marching for women.

Jessica, a veteran, stated that it standing up for the rights of others, regardless of race, color, or gender, is part of her obligation to the country.

“As a woman I feel I need to be vocal about oppression. As a veteran I’m obligated to stand up for my rights and for the rights of others.”

Faiza revealed that the Women’s March is not necessarily a show of power, but a demonstration of the people’s responsibility to “love, protect, and protest.”

Winnie chose to march to fight against sexism and structural patriarchy.

“I march because our democracy is a dumpster fire. I march because structural patriarchy must be dismantled. I march because we fight sexism with solidarity.”

Erin chose to march for the rights of women of color under Donald Trump’s presidency.

“I’m marching because so much will be at stake for women of color under a Trump presidency, and we need to be the leaders that steer our country toward progressive change.”

Linda states that she had no choice but to march, she had to do it to protect her family and community.

“I have no choice but to organize to protect my family and the communities that I love. We must stand up and fight back, people’s lives depend on it.”

Despite the differences, each of the women above, and more that shared their missions on Metro, all have one thing in common: they need their voices to be heard and change to take place within the United States and beyond.

Although the original focus of the Women’s March was to send a message to Donald Trump and all that perceptually think in the same manner as him, the message soon became much broader in scope. It soon referenced the familiar chant that has been voiced so often in the various medias. All lives matter.

It is not enough to focus on one type of individual, but instead the voices of all. As Hillary Clinton tweeted, it is about “Hope, not fear.”

The Sisters March organized around 670 gatherings around the world, according to the Daily Mail.

In President Donald Trump’s speech, he relayed that he is in office to serve the American people. On Twitter, he applauded the peaceful Women’s March, claiming it is a “hallmark of our democracy.”

It remains to bee seen how President Trump’s focus on the American people will play out. However, events such as the Women’s March have showed him that the American people would not sit by idly without holding him accountable.

Did you join one of the many women’s marches yesterday? If so, what was your reason? Share in the comments below.

[Featured Image by Katz/Shutterstock]

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