Women’s March On Washington: Secret Service Allegedly Investigating After Madonna Said She ‘Thought About Blowing Up White House’

JohnThomas Didymus

A spokesperson for the Secret Service has allegedly said that the agency is “aware” of pop star Madonna’s comment at Saturday’s Women’s March on Washington that she had thought about “blowing up the White House.” The spokesperson allegedly said that although the Secret Service will open an investigation, the decision to prosecute rests on the U.S. Attorney’s office.

The conservative blog Gateway Pundit claimed that it contacted a spokesperson for the Secret Service who said the agency was “aware” of Madonna’s inflammatory comments at the rally held during Saturday’s Women’s March on Washington protest.

However, when the Daily Mail contacted the Secret Service, the agency reportedly declined comment.

The development comes after the pop icon Madonna delivered a controversial address to tens of thousands at the Women’s March on Washington rally held at the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on Saturday afternoon. In an expletive-laden speech, she railed against the 2016 general election result, saying that she had actually “thought a lot about blowing up the White House,” but she realized that the action “wouldn’t change anything.”

“I’m angry. Yes, I am outraged. Yes, I have thought an awful lot about blowing up the White House. But I know that this won’t change anything.”

“We cannot fall into despair,” she continued. “As the poet W. H. Auden once wrote on the eve of World War II, ‘We must love one another or die.’ I choose love. Are you with me?”

Although many were uncomfortable with Madonna’s comment about “blowing up the White House,” the crowd responded to her expletive-ridden speech with a raucous applause.

The question whether Madonna had committed a felony under the U.S. Code sparked a debate among Gateway Pundit readers.

Many Trump supporters argued that Madonna’s statement was a “direct threat” to the president of the United States and thus a crime under existing federal laws. Others argued that her comment was protected under the First Amendment because she never said that she “wanted to blow up the White House” but that she “thought about it” but did not want to do it because she knew “it wouldn’t change anything.”

A reader summed up arguments in Madonna’s favor, saying that fantasizing about blowing up the White House was not a crime.

Madonna at Women's March on Washington
Madonna performs at the Women’s March on Washington rally. [Image by Jose Luis Magana/AP Images]

“Yes, it was just a fantasy. But speaking it publicly on a platform like that is dangerous,” another reader responded. “It normalizes violence, perhaps even encourages it. She’s got millions of fans, some of them are crazy. What would happen if one of those people in her concert did hurt Trump? She’d definitely be partially guilty.”

The turnout for Saturday’s Women’s March on Washington shattered all expectations. An estimated half a million people converged on Washington to protest the election and inauguration of Donald Trump as president of the United States after media analysts estimated that only about 200,000 people would participate in the march.

The turnout was so heavy that the streets of Washington were packed tightly for miles with people who came out to protest Trump’s presidency because they believed that it posed a threat to women’s rights issues. Analysts said it was the largest presidential inauguration-linked protest in U.S. history.

There were also more than 600 sister marches throughout the country and the rest of the world.

Madonna under investigation by Secret Service
Madonna sings at Women’s March on Washington. [Image by Jose Luis Magana/AP Images]

The protesters wore knitted pink p***y hats, a reference to Trump’s vulgar comment about “grabbing p***y.”

Several celebrities, including America Ferrera, Scarlett Johnasson, Michael Moore and Alicia Keys spoke at the event in D.C.

Speeches called for women to run for office and fight against sexism, sexual harassment and to defend women’s reproductive rights.

“The president is not America, his cabinet is not America,” Ferrera said. “We are America, and we are here to stay. We march for our families… for our neighbors… for our futures.”

“We reject the demonization of our Muslim brothers and sisters,” she continued. “We demand an end to the system of murder and incarceration of our black brothers and sisters. We will not give up our rights to safe and legal abortions. We will not ask our LGBTQ families to go backwards. We will not go from being a nation of immigrants to a nation of ignorance.”

Ashley Judd, Hollywood actress and political activist, also caused controversy by attacking President Trump through a reference to his daughter Ivanka.

“I feel Hitler in these streets, a mustache traded for a toupee,” she said, reciting a poem. “I am a nasty woman [a reference to Trump’s attack against Hillary Clinton during one of the presidential debates]. I’m not as nasty as a man who looks like he bathes in Cheeto dust.”

“I’m not as nasty as your own daughter being your favorite sex symbol, your wet dreams infused with your own genes.”

“And our p***ies aren’t for grabbing, they’re for reminding you that our walls are stronger than America’s ever will be.”

The crowd cheered her speech.

“The revolution starts here, the fight for the right to be free… we will not back down… there is power in our unity, and that no opposing force stands a chance in the face of true solidarity,” she concluded.

Director Michael Moore also addressed the crowd, saying that the purpose of the march was to “end the Trump carnage.” He pointed out that majority of Americans voted against Donald Trump and that contrary to newspaper headlines that said “Trump has taken power,” power remains with the people.

He advised the participants to be more politically active by calling Congress daily and joining organizations, such as Planned Parenthood and American Civil Liberties Union.

He also urged liberals to “take over the Democratic Party” and push the “old guard” out.

“We need new leadership, we need young leadership, we need women, we need people of color, gay and lesbian and bisexual and transgender,” he said.

[Featured Image by Jose Luis Magana/AP Images]