Should liberal blue American states join Canadian territory?

Liberal Blue States Of America Invited To Join Canada

When Donald Trump began his run for president of the United States, some Americans started looking abroad for greener pastures, and now one country has heard the cry of millions of people, as Canada has just extended an olive branch of peace by inviting the liberal blue states of America to join Canada.

The Independent revealed that a reporter from British Columbia is the newest Canadian to invite America’s blue states of California, Oregon, Washington, and Nevada to join Canadian territory.

One month ago, a Facebook user from Beaverton, Oregon, posted a message to Canada. His plea was a direct request to Canada, which suggested that California, Oregon, Washington, and Nevada residents wished to secede. The poster offered “our people, our land and our resources to you, oh Canada.”

The U.S. and Canada border between Blaine, Washington and White Rock, British Columbia on November 8, 2001.
The U.S. and Canada border between Blaine, Washington, and White Rock, British Columbia, on November 8, 2001. [Image by Jeff Vinnick/Getty Images]

The Facebook user isn’t the only one who is enamored with the idea of liberal blue states becoming Canadian, as a Canadian poster, this time on Twitter, suggested that all the coastal states of America could go to Canada if the remaining interior ones remained American territory.

Chad Harris, a Canadian reporter, heard the messages of these Americans and posted his own reply on Twitter.

“I’m sure we can work something out if you want to join Canada. To the west coast of the United States, if you want to you can all become Canadian Provinces, since you voted closer to the experiences we have as Canadian.”

Harris also posted a handy map of what this new Canadian territory would look like when it was combined with the West Coast of the United States.

Is the possibility of liberal blue American states joining Canadian territory something that could ever become a reality?

As 61.4 percent of California voters have cast ballots for Hillary Clinton, the state has already drafted plans for a referendum, known as Calexit, which would see California secede from the United States in 2019. With #Calexit still trending highly on Twitter, could the “Yes, California” movement that proposes the state become an independent republic succeed?

“Being a US state is no longer serving California’s best interests. On issues ranging from peace and security to natural resources and the environment, it has become increasingly true that California would be better off as an independent country. In 2016, the United Kingdom voted to leave the international community with their ‘Brexit’ vote. Our ‘Calexit’ referendum is about California joining the international community.”

There are some who are doubtful as to whether California could become its own independent republic. Also thought to be unlikely is the idea that large swathes of American states could join Canadian territory.

The Aurora Borealis in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada on May 7, 2016.
The Aurora Borealis in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, on May 7, 2016. [Image by Scott Olson/Getty Images]

Metro has reported that in a case of Texas v. White in 1869, the Supreme Court has already made up its mind about movements like this. The Supreme Court states that there is no place for “reconsideration or revocation, except through revolution or through consent of the States.”

What this means is that unless there was a large revolution that was staged in California, Oregon, Washington, and Nevada, American states could never become Canadian territory. The only other way around this would be if these four states were able to convince the rest of America that they would be better off without them and allowed to become Canadian. It seems unlikely that this would ever happen.

What do you think? If you reside in California, Oregon, Washington, or Nevada, would you be happy to see those liberal blue states join Canadian territory?

[Featured Image by Andrew Harnik/AP Images]

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