cincinnati enquirer endorses mitt romney

The ‘Cincinnati Enquirer’ Endorses Mitt Romney

The Cincinnati Enquirer, one of the largest newspapers in Ohio, officially endorsed Mitt Romney. The paper cited the Republican nominee’s success as a business leader and former governor among the primary reasons for the presidential endorsement.

The Ohio newspaper considers Romney’s past record as the “best indicator” of how he would lead the nation. The Cincinnati Enquirer reports that the GOP presidential candidate entered the governor’s office during the worst recession Massachusetts had seen in decades. He was forced to deal with a looming $450 million budget shortfall immediately after taking office.

The newspaper’s endorsement also had this to say about the candidate’s fiscal expertise:

“Romney’s approach was businesslike, and he didn’t spare any sacred cows. He made deep cuts in local government funding and to education. He didn’t raise state taxes, but he increased fees for many government services, which raised hundreds of millions. He took heat from businesses for closing loopholes that saved them money but cost the state revenue. He blocked companies from transferring intellectual property to out-of-state shell companies, and he barred banks and other companies from avoiding taxes by paper restructuring.”

The Cincinnati paper also noted that balancing the budget is required by Massachusetts state law. When Mitt Romney left office, the state boasted a $600 million surplus, according to the endorsement. The Republican candidate is credited with replenishing the state’s reserve fund just two years into his term as governor and increasing the fund to $2 billion before he left office in 2007.

The editorial had this to say about President Obama’s job performance:

“President Barack Obama has had four years to overcome the job losses of the Great Recession he inherited, but the recovery has been too slow and too weak. It’s time for new leadership from Mitt Romney, a governor and business leader with a record of solving problems. Four years later, though, we’re still at risk of backpedaling into another recession, the housing market is still suffering and we have a sense of drift, not of common purpose.”

Comments