Walt Disney's will is up for auction

Walt Disney’s Will Goes Up For Auction, House Up For Sale

Profiles in History, a California-based auctioneer, is presenting over 600 vintage items up for auction today at the “Animation & Disneyana Auction,” including Walt Disney’s last will and testament, reports Yahoo Finance. Expected to sell between $40,000 and $60,000, the will is a nine-page document that mentions information about Disney Production stock and will go up for bid today.

Another big item up for sale is another Disney-signed document that was the legal license for use of his name. It is expected to receive between $60,000 to $80,000. The “Animation & Disneyana Auction” is also taking bids for many production cels used in the making of Pinocchio, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, and Peter Pan. One cel used for the animated 1950 film Cinderella, complete in her ball gown, is expected to fetch between $13,000 to $20,000. This is really significant because at one time, the production cels used for Disney movies were considered to be worthless, and many were thrown away. During the early days of Disneyland, some cels were sold for $1 each.

Eddy Nelson and Walt Disney
American actor Eddy Nelson and Walt Disney look over a music score for the Disney film ‘Make Mine Music.’ [Image by Getty Images]

Other production cels from other movie studios will be auctioned off today as well, including cels from many Warner Bros. Looney Tunes cartoon shorts, Peanuts TV specials, and The Simpsons.

Today’s auction is also said to offer up props, costumes, and other vintage memorabilia from Disney Studios and other movie studios and Disney theme parks.

Meanwhile, the Daily Mail reports that Walt Disney’s ranch home in Palm Springs is being put up for sale. Built in 1962, the family has stayed with the Disney family until 2015. The home is being sold by HK Lane Real Estate for $899,000 and appears to be in pristine condition. The home features portraits of Disney holding hands with Mickey Mouse etched into some of the walls. Although definitely vintage, the house still has a modern look, with splashes of primary colors and an art deco look.

This Disney home located at 2688 S. Camino Real in Palm Springs has a description on the HK Realty website that reads as follows.

“This sprawling home was built for the legendary cartoonist, filmmaker and amusement park owner. Walt Disney and his wife Lillian called this desert escape home during their twilight years. The home was owned by the Disney Family until 2015. Walt had this house built in 1962, around the time when his famous television show, Walt Disney Presents upgraded from black-and-white to color, changing its name to Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color. It is no surprise that the interiors of this Palm Springs paradise are a study in color – with bold reds, blues and yellows making for a Technicolor experience with dramatic art deco influences. The new owners have lovingly preserved Walt’s vision of desert luxury – keeping the vibrant and beautiful animated color scheme and most of the furniture. Generating income as a vacation rental home or you can treat yourself to life in the desert the way Walt Disney imagined it. The spacious 4 bed 4 bath home boasts 180 degrees of beautiful mountain views.”


RELATED REPORTS FROM INQUISITR:

Walt Disney’s First L.A. Home Saved From Demolition For 75 Days
Walt Disney World Announces New ‘Raiders’ Prop On Display And New Christmas Show At Disney Hollywood Studios
Walt Disney Scared The Pants Off Of Us Numerous Times


Walt Disney and his wife
Walt Disney arriving in England with his wife on the cruise liner Queen Elizabeth. [Image by Getty Images]

“Walt Disney and his wife Lillian called this desert escape home during their twilight years,” said agent Klint Watkins.

Walt called the home “Smoke Tree Ranch” and described the refuge as his “laughing place,” a reference to the 1946 Song of the South movie. Disney had visited the ranch where the home was built in the 1930s, and Charlie Doyle, the previous owner, ask Walt to become a partner.

“I didn’t have the money he thought I did, for I was still having problems financing my productions. Actually, it wasn’t until after Mickey Mouse that we could afford to have a house there,” Disney said at the time.

[Featured Image by Getty Images]

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