Border wall with Mexico: President-elect Donald Trump plan morphing into one for fence similar to that proposed by the Democratic nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Donald Trump: Mexico Border Wall Now ‘Fence Extension,’ Original Plan ‘Not Realistic’

In a recent video, Cenk Uygur with The Young Turks asked if viewers remembered President-elect Donald Trump’s defining promise during his successful presidential campaign.

“Everyone knows it right?” the TYT host asked.

The Inquisitr has previously reported on the promised Trump wall along the length of the entire Mexican border; a wall that is “impenetrable” and features sensors “above and below ground.”

At the same Phoenix, Arizona rally where Donald Trump described his border wall, he stated that undocumented immigrants with criminal records will be deported on “day one” of a Trump administration, which will now become a reality on Friday, January 20, 2017, as reported by Billboard.

Whether or not Donald Trump intends to follow through with his plans to deport criminal undocumented immigrants appears unknown. It has been said that the president-elect is backpedaling on the issue of the Trump wall, which now may be becoming a Trump fence, more in line with what has been previously proposed by his presidential opponent, Democratic nominee and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, as reported by PolitiFact.

As the U.S. senator from New York, Hillary Clinton voted in favor of the Secure Fence Act of 2006, which called for the installation of “double-layer fencing across 700 miles of the border.” Today, only 32 miles of the 700-mile fence are said to be “double-layered.”

Immediately following Trump’s election early Wednesday morning, Congressional aides were said to be seeking meetings with Trump’s administration in search of a “less costly option” than a border wall.

The new plan is said to call for more border agents, who are said to be members of Trump-backing unions, and a more extensive border fence. More extensive double-layered sections have also been proposed, as reported by Reuters.

“All of a sudden, it’s not a wall, it’s a fence,” Cenk Uygur observed the metamorphosis of the Trump plan.

The TYT host noted Hillary Clinton’s previous support of a border fence.

Steve Legomsky with the Washington University School of Law described any fence that does get built as being out of an attempt to “save face” on the part of both Donald Trump and Congress.

President-elect Donald Trump: Wall along border with Mexico backpedalling into border fence or 'fence extension.'
President-elect Donald Trump and Melania in the White House, on November 10. [Image by Zach Gibson/Getty Images]

Uygur described the back and forth between President-elect Trump and the former secretary of state during their presidential campaigns as “Kabuki theater.”

“The minute they get into office,” Uygur observed.

“He said fence. She said fence.”

“We’re going to build a fence!” the TYT host tried out an alternative Trump rally chant. “It’s going to be double-layered!”

TYT reported on the statements of an official with the Department of Homeland Security and a Republican Congressional aide describing the almost legendary Trump wall, comparable to the Great Wall of China, as reported by PolitiFact, as being “not realistic” on account of concerns with private land, water bodies, lines of sight for border agents, and the overall ruggedness of the land along the border.

Donald Trump: wall along border with Mexico morphing into fence extension, border fence plan, similar to the Secure Fence Act of 2006, supported by then-New York Senator Hillary Clinton.
The Mexican border near San Diego, California. [Image by John Moore/Getty Images]

“They say you’ll never be able to build a wall,” Trump was quoted in March.

“The Great Wall of China, built 2,000 years ago, is 13,000 miles, folks, and they didn’t have Caterpillar tractors… We can do that so beautifully. And this is going to be a serious wall. This is going to be a high wall.”

The Government of Mexico was reported to reiterate its refusal to pay for any border wall after Hillary Clinton conceded to Donald Trump early Wednesday morning. Reuters reports that requests for comment from the president-elect’s spokespeople with regard to the Trump wall have gone unanswered.

Despite the new reported Trump plans for a “fence extension” and the recruitment of more border patrol agents, the National Border Patrol Council reports challenges hiring the number of personnel it requires in guidelines set forth by Congress.

[Featured Image by Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images]

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