Lenovo Yoga Book

Microsoft Surface Pro 4 Challenged By New Lenovo Yoga Book

The Microsoft Surface Pro 4 is considered the standard when it comes to laptop/tablet hybrids. Sites such as Digital Trends gave the Pro 4 a near perfect review.

“The Surface Pro 4 is a microcosm of the change Microsoft is trying to spur inside its own walls. Time and time again, it missed the opportunity to leap on a new trend in consumer technology. But not with Surface. This time, Microsoft is a leader. It’s setting the trend. And unlike its new competitors, it’s had a few years to work out the kinks.”

Lenovo hopes to take away some of Microsoft’s market share with the new Yoga Book. The Verge has the news.

“But Lenovo, which has made a bunch of these convertible creations, has come up with something that not only makes sense, but nudges the category forward with a completely new kind of keyboard. It’s called the Yoga Book, and it’s an incredibly thin and light tablet-like machine with a flat, touch-sensitive surface that lights up into a glowing keyboard.”

Microsoft Surface Pro 4
Can Lenovo’s new device really compete with Microsoft’s Surface Pro 4? [Image by Andrew Burton/Getty Images]

The article adds that the lower panel on the Yoga Book also doubles as a Wacom digitizer surface, which means you can use a stylus pen to draw on it as well. Although critic Lauren Goode is fascinated with the device, she says the keyboard comes with a learning curve.

However, Engadget, who claims the Yoga Book is a novelty item not worth purchasing yet, isn’t as thrilled as The Verge is.

“The Lenovo Yoga Book, available in Android ($500) and Windows ($550) versions, is inventive. But Lenovo claims that the Yoga Book is the ‘ultimate tablet for productivity and creativity,’ and that’s where the company is wrong,” says columnist Cherlynn Low, adding that there are many well-intended elements such as multi-window support, but these enhancements never truly add up to anything productive.

Commenters after the article aren’t impressed either.

“Maybe someday I, or humans in general(?), will be able to proficiently type on a completely flat surface with no key travel, but that day ain’t today,” points out “Mcdonsco.”

“As an artist I was kinda hoping that this would pan out but seems to not quite be there yet. Kudos to Lenovo for taking a shot at something unique,” says “Mattburnzy.”

Even if the Yoga Book doesn’t sell well, Lenovo has become the biggest PC maker. In March, Forbes ran an article on how Lenovo became the largest PC maker in the world. Forbes contributor Johan Nylander interviewed Erik Mok, who became the company’s global secretary in 2005. Mok talked about the company’s continued drive with all of the growth.

“We are still very hungry, both in terms of technology and business. The IT industry is moving very fast and we have to stay hungry for new innovative technology. We are also keen to enter into new markets. Today, we have employees in more than 60 countries and are looking to develop business in more countries, especially developing markets. It’s very important to keep up this spirit,” Mok said.

Earlier this year, the Inquisitr reported on the Yoga 900, which is perhaps Lenovo’s most popular convertible laptop. It has received the best reviews out of most of the laptops in this category. CNET gave the 900 four stars.

“Lenovo clearly listened to feedback about last year’s high-end Yoga, keeping the excellent overall design but boosting the specs to match other premium 13-inch laptops,” claimed reviewer Dan Ackerman.

The conclusion of the review summarized what a lot of other critics had been saying.

“The latest version of Lenovo’s Yoga hybrid laptop is easily the best yet. It takes the excellent revamped design from the previous model and adapts it to work with higher-end components, showing a significant real-world improvement in both performance and battery life.”

Even though the Yoga Book hasn’t been as welcomed as the Yoga 900 by critics, perhaps it will be a huge hit once it gets into customers’ hands. The Yoga Book can now be purchased at Lenovo’s site for $499.99.

[Featured Image by David Ramos/Getty Images]

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